The South Lamar Corridor Mobility Program aims to improve mobility, safety, and accessibility along the South Lamar corridor for everyone: people who walk, bike, use transit, or drive.

The first phase of the South Lamar Corridor Mobility Program resulted in a Corridor Plan, which was completed in April 2016. The plan document provides recommendations for infrastructure improvements along the corridor.

The 2016 Mobility Bond, approved by Austin voters last November, allocates $482 million to analyzing, designing, and construct corridor improvement projects throughout the city, including on South Lamar Boulevard. Exactly how much from the $482 million will go to each corridor is yet to be decided.

Where we are now

The South Lamar Corridor Plan, and all other completed corridor plans provide a basis for further analysis and development of potential projects.

The Corridor Plans identify more potential projects than there is available funding through the 2016 Mobility Bond Program. The next step in the Corridor Mobility Program is to identify recommended projects to comprise a Corridor Construction Program. In accordance with Resolution 20160818-074, Council’s Contract With Voters, the City Manager will recommend a Corridor Construction Program for Council to review and approve for funding.

Sign up to receive the 2016 Mobility Bond Newsletter to stay up to date.

Sign up to receive the South Lamar Corridor Newsletter to stay up to date

Background

The first phase of the South Lamar Corridor Mobility Program resulted in a Corridor Plan. The Austin Transportation Department completed the South Lamar Corridor Plan in April 2016, and it contains short, mid, and long-term transportation safety improvements to enhance multimodal (vehicle, transit, pedestrian, and bicycle) mobility, safety, and accessibility as well as develop opportunities for positive impacts to the community’s overall health and well-being.

Recommendations included in the South Lamar Corridor Plan

Recommendations developed for South Lamar Boulevard were based on input from the public meetings and stakeholder meetings, the results of land-use and traffic analyses, and several related Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies.

Because additional analysis and public input will be sought prior to recommending or constructing improvements, recommendations included in the completed South Lamar Corridor report should be considered the basis for continued conversations, and not final.

The South Lamar Corridor report included short- and long-term strategies to address safety and mobility along the corridor. The estimated total cost for both short- and long-term improvements, excluding right-of-way acquisition costs, is $60,400,000.

Short-term improvements

Short-term improvements are those considered feasible to implement immediately or within five years of completing the report. These tend to be improvements which are quicker to install because of low cost, minimal design or engineering, etc.

Some examples of recommended short-term improvements include:

  • New traffic and pedestrian signals
  • Reducing left-turn movements at critical points through signage and medians to enhance safety
  • Enhanced bicycle activity along and across the corridor through construction of cycle tracks, bike lanes and other similar facilities
  • Installation of transit-oriented facilities such as bus pull outs, bus-only lanes and transit queue jumps
  • Build out of the recommended cross section in some segments of the corridor

For a complete list of short-term improvement recommendations to receive additional analysis and public feedback, please see page E-6 of the report.

The estimated total cost of short term improvements excluding right-of-way acquisition costs: $20.4 million.

Long-term improvements

Long-term improvements are improvements which may take five to 20 years to complete. Long-term improvements are typically more complex and may have a higher capital cost, require more detailed engineering and design, right of way acquisition, etc.

Some examples of long-term recommendations included in the report include:

  • Build out of recommended ultimate cross section for full length of corridor
  • Traffic and pedestrian signals
  • Centralized parking facilities
  • Implementation of transit-only lanes during peak periods

For a complete list of long-term improvement recommendations to receive additional analysis and public feedback, please see page E-9 of the report.

The estimated total cost of long-term improvements excluding right-of-way acquisition costs: $40 million.

Corridor Characteristics

South Lamar Boulevard between Riverside Drive and Ben White Boulevard is a highly traveled roadway and a primary route to and from Downtown Austin.

It is an important commercial corridor and home to a diverse group of residents living in proximity to the roadway. The corridor landscape is rapidly changing attracting more people to the corridor looking to be part of the local culture.

The auto-centric nature of South Lamar Boulevard is in transition, with density increasing and more pedestrian-friendly places and landscapes. However, the rapid growth along the corridor is causing safety and mobility concerns.

Corridor Program Materials

South Lamar Boulevard Corridor Improvement Program Final Report - Uploaded May 6, 2016

Materials Archive