Jan 24, 2013 - 10:17 am CST

Written by Laura Esparza, Manager of the History, Arts & Nature Division.

Fidencio Duran’s solo exhibition HEAVEN AND EARTH opened Saturday, January 19 at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center.  I attended with my friend Rose Marie Klee who I met through Leadership Austin.  Rose and I are big fans of Fidencio’s work via his large scaled murals at the airport.  This selection of his work is a much more intimate invitation into his artistic process and a look at work on a smaller scale.

Laura, Fidencio, and Rose Marie

L to R: Laura Esparza, Fidencio Duran and Rose Marie Klee

Birdhouse

Fidencio explains in his artist's statement that the theme of birdhouses appeared in an earlier work because of his father’s dedicated craftsmanship of building birdhouses.  He then explains that the birdhouse theme grew when he was painting in a state of grief for his father.  The birdhouse transcends Fidencio’s South Texas earthy realism and introduces us to the surreal and metaphorical aspects of his work—the birdhouse as a kind of floating heaven.

Laundry

"Laundry"

Fidencio’s incredible talent for drawing introduces the journey toward his homeland and we meet the raw reality of birth and death in the lives of farm workers.  His work, "Laundry", is one of my favorite, not only for the intricate detail of a patchwork quilt in flight, but for the sense of immediacy in the response of the woman to an unknown caller off-canvas.  That sense of time demonstrates the same steely accuracy as his sense of light.  Painting in medias res is a convention of painting better known in painting of the Romantic era, but in the context of a South Texas landscape, it provides a momentary glimpse of South Texas life that is greater than the sum of paint on canvas.

This painting reminds me of starlit Texas nights when I was a kid at my Tia’s house in Helotes.  Don’t miss this show as the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center, on exhibit through March 30, 2013.  You can access the gallery Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m..

For more information, contact the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center at 512-974-3772 or online at maccaustin.org.

Photography by permission of Victor Ovalle and Laura Esparza.

Dec 10, 2012 - 11:07 am CST

In 2009, the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Advisory Board established the Award of Excellence. This recognition is for those individuals and groups that have demonstrated significant leadership and have made meaningful contributions in Latino cultural arts.

The Award of Excellence is to be granted as the highest distinction and celebration of a lasting contribution, artistic excellence and dedication, or leadership with distinguished service and outstanding performance.

This year’s nominees for the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center’s Award of Excellence are nominated by their peers for their significant leadership and contributions in Latino cultural arts. This year’s nominees are:

Mr. Dan Arellano

The Latino Theater Alliance (ALTA)

Mr. Johnny Degollado

Mr. Manuel “Cowboy” Donley

Mr. Alfredo Estrada

Ms. Gloria “La Tejana” Morales

Mr. Anthony Ortiz, Jr.

Mr. Juan Jose Sanchez

Mr. Miguel Angel Santana

Mr. Raul Valdez

and

Ms. Claudia Zapata

We congratulate and thank all of our nominees for their outstanding work. Your contributions do not go unrecognized.

 

And the winners are:

 

The Service category of the Award is for those who have exhibited outstanding service in the Latino cultural arts. The winner for this year is Claudia Zapata, one of Austin’s well-known curators, whose innovative exhibitions and educational programming has been featured at the Mexic-Arte Museum, the Serie Project, and Esperanza Peace and Justice Center. Check out her recently founded Chingozine for local news in the Latino art scene.

Our Patronage Award goes to Alfredo Estrada for his significant contributions in support of the Latino cultural arts. Alfredo is the founding editor of Latino magazine, and is also behind the nonprofit organization No Mas Hambre that last year alone collected over 1,000 pounds of food for the Capital Area Food Bank. He organizes the annual Nuestro Futuro Latino Education conference in Washington D.C., and has generously allowed two students to attend a summer camp at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on scholarship.

Our Emerging Artist category represents those age 15-25 who have shown innovative and exceptional accomplishments in the Latino cultural arts. Our winner this year is Anthony Ortiz Jr., who has mastered accordion and has played with his father and grandfather in their band Mariachi Corbetas, as well as shared the stage with Hank Williams Jr. and Julio Inglesias. Having been recognized with Resolution Number 1988 from the Texas House of Representatives and won several awards, he currently teaches accordion classes at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center and is highly regarded as a role model to his students.

 

 

Emerging Artist Anthony Ortiz Jr. accepting his Award of Excellence from Austin City Council member Laura Morrison.

 

 

In the area of Theater, our winner is the Austin Latino Theater Alliance (ALTA). Operating for 14 years with the mission of uniting and supporting the different Latino and Hispanic theater groups in Austin, ALTA works to foster the development of new talents in the theater arts, promote collaborative productions among local and international artists, and bring the highest quality theater to Austin’s Latino and Hispanic communities with Hispanic and Latin American productions that transcend borders and unite different groups and audiences.

Our Lifetime Achievement Award in the Visual Arts goes to Raul Valdez, who has been an active leader in the Latino community for decades. He is an artist, teacher, and advocate and some of his most notable murals can be found on school walls throughout Austin, including the University of Texas School of Social Work, and the A.B. Cantu Pan-American Recreation Center. He has become a symbol of what the arts can do for the public when they are supported.

For the Lifetime Achievement Award in Music, the selection committee felt that Johnny Degollado and Manuel “Cowboy” Donley equally deserved this award. As one of Austin’s leading conjunto accordionists, Johnny Degollado y Su Conjunto has promoted conjunto music in Austin and has written over 200 songs and recorded over 350. Johnny was inducted into the Tejano Music Hall of Fame in 1986, and has been the event coordinator for the Austin Conjunto Festival for 20 years. Listen to a sample of his music here.

 

 

Johnny Degollado accepting his Lifetime Achievement Award of Excellence from Austin City Council member Laura Morrison.

 

 

Our second recipient for the Lifetime Achievement Award in Music is Manuel “Cowboy” Donley. Known by many as the “Godfather of Tejano Music,” Donley has been a pioneer and innovator, combining traditional Mexican sounds with rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm-and-blues, and big band swing in his orquesta, Las Estrellas. Like Johnny Degollado, Manuel was inducted into the Tejano Music Hall of Fame in 1986 and has had a neighborhood park named after him by the City of Austin. The Governor of Texas announced a Proclamation in Manuel’s honor last year. Manuel continues his contributions to Tejano music and his community by teaching guitar lessons at Huston-Tillotson College and at his own home.

Manuel “Cowboy” Donley is pictured below alongside Herlinda Zamora and Linda Crockett in front of a painting by Alejandro Moreno Alanis. This painting is the first ever portrait of four related musical legends from the Guerrero and Donley families of East Austin: Ramon Guerrero Donley, his cousin, Longinos “Lonnie” Guerrero; Lonnie’s son, Luis “Louie” Guerrero, and Ramon’s son Manuel “Cowboy” Donley. The artwork was commissioned by Louie’s son, Sergio Guerrero and it was unveiled and presented by Alanis and the Texas Music Museum of Austin for the first time to Manuel “Cowboy” Donley on February 26, 2012. The Guerrero y Donley portrait was donated to the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on November 29th, 2012 to help continue the preservation of Mexican American cultural arts and heritage.

 

Manuel “Cowboy” Donley, recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award of Excellence, with Herlinda Zamora (Left) and Linda Crockett of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center.

 

Nov 05, 2012 - 01:54 pm CST

George Washington Carver Museum & Cultural Center celebrated the Halloween spirit by hosting its 2012 Pumpkin Carving Event.

Pumpkin Carving and Festive Costumes

George Washington Carver Museum and Culture Center held festive activities on Saturday, October 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Carver’s Northside dock.

Pumpkin Carving on the Dock volunteers and participants in the costume contest display and show off their spooktacular outfits. Free face painting, music, food was offered.  A fun time was had by all who attended.  Photo by Carver Staff.

George Washington Carver museum pumpkin carving

We had a great turnout and from these photos you can see that the whole community enjoys carving pumpkins!

pumkin carving

 

pumpkin carving

 

pumpkin carving

 

pumpkin carving

About The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center

The george Washington carver Museum and Cultural center

The Center is located at 1165 Angelina St. Austin, Texas, 78702

Tel: (512) 974-4926 or visit www. CarverMuseum.org

 

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Nov 02, 2012 - 02:46 pm CDT

The 2012 Halloween Howl at the Austin Nature and Science Center was an overwhelming success!

We had nearly 700 people show up to our evening event. This year, families met a live owl, snake, lizard, bat, hissing cockroach and other animals. Participants hiked the Zilker Preserve by moonlight, visited our planetarium and learned something new in our mad scientist's lab. Over 150 families stopped by to take pictures in our new Nature Photo booth. Many families commented that they don't often have opportunities to take family photos, and our photo booth gave them a fun opportunity to do so. Feedback we received was very positive all around. Because of our new "activity pass" system, families had more time to explore our booths and spent less time waiting in line. Halloween Howl gets better every year!

Graphic of poster for Halloween Howl

Halloween lighting

The Austin Nature and Science Center’s grounds were festooned with festive Halloween lighting.

Maragret as a blue butterfly

Margaret Russell dressed as a blue butterfly.

Halloween Howl visitors

Margaret Russell graciously greeted our guests.

Kathy maddox

ANSC's Kathy Maddox and Debra Windsor

vistors to the AN&SC

Our guests enjoyed our Science Center

Halloween Hawl visitor

Great history and nature - inspired costumes seemed to predominate the creative outfits for the evening.

photo booth

Something new this year: over 150 families stopped by to take pictures in our Nature Photo booth.

Barbara P. with lizard

ANSC's Barbara Peterson's live reptile display was a hit.

Insect display

On the trail outside we had more displays and activities. Our insect display was an interesting stop.

insect display

Hissing Cockroaches are always a draw.

bone display

How could Halloween be complete without a "bones" display?

Worm display

Our worm display lets kids create art with rubber worms dipped in paint. Then our guests discovered the important role worms play in our ecosystem.

planetarium

Our inflatable planetarium provided an interesting explanation of the night sky.

sand lot

Our sand box playground was a center for activity.

Reptile display

Our reptile, insect and fish exhibit gives great lessons about our nocturnal friends in the animal kingdom.

science experiment

Our new demonstration in our mad scientist's lab gave visitors a fun introduction to electricity and the science of how circuits work.

face painting

Face painting and tattoos were equally great hits with the kids.

facepainting

You could sense the fun ANSC's staff had with our visitors.

staff

Everybody seemed to be in the spirit of the Halloween.

live owl display

Our live animal presentations allowed guests to see animals like owls, which can usually only be heard, not seen in nature.

About The Austin Nature & Science Center

austinNature & science Center photo

The center is located at 301 Nature Center Drive, Austin, Texas, 78746

Admission is always free. The Center is open Mon. - Sat. 9 am - 5pm and Sunday Noon - 5pm

For more info on Programs, Classes and Summer Camps, please call (512)974-3888 or visit:

http://www.austintexas.gov/department/austin-nature-science-center

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Oct 31, 2012 - 02:00 pm CDT

The Joseph and Susanna Dickinson Hannig Museum celebrated its newest exhibit with opening day festivities.

The exhibit which opened Saturday, October 20, will be on display through February 23, 2013.

Graphic for exhibit

German Band at opening day

The Polkadillos Band graciously performed for us. Their German music demonstrated the influences that the German community had on all of Texas.

Today's Tejano music still displays the strong German influence from over a century ago!

Susanna Dickinson and Joseph Hannig reenactors

The crowd enjoyed historic reenactors: Joyce Aldridge as Susanna Dickinson and Warren Fredrick as Joseph Hannig

Susanna Dickinson reenactors

October 20th, 2012

Our opening day events included: lecture by the renowned historian and curator, James L. Haley, informative performances by Susanna Dickinson & Joseph Hannig reenactors and live German music provided by the Polkadillos. We enjoyed perfect weather for our relaxing Saturday afternoon event. Guests enjoyed the entertainment and music while leisurely touring the museum.

Lawn game of Giant Chess pieces

A game of giant chess pieces in Brush Square.

German american society

German-Texan Heritage Society also had a table with information for our visitors.

The Museum's newest exhibit  “Joseph Hannig and the Texas Germans,” ex­plores the life of Joseph Han­nig and the impact of German settlement on Texas and the city of Austin.

entry way to museum

Entryway to the Museum and new exhibit.

opening display panel

Display panel in new exhibit.

new exhibit

new exhibit

 

bed quilt

Visitors admire period bed quilt.

exhibit panel

The exhibit spans over a century of German involvement in Texas. It describes their participation in taming this new land, from the first German to reach our shores to the thousands that followed. Christian Friedrich Dirks, who is generally considered the first German immigrant (he was actually on the run after stealing his benefactor’s postal receipts). After changing his name to Johann Friedrich Ernst, he received a land grant in Stephen F. Austin’s colony in 1831. From this safe haven, Ernst’s letters home, praising Tex­as as a paradise of freedom and plenty, were widely published and created a sensation. By the 1850s, more than 20,000 native Germans called Texas home, surpassing Hispanics as its largest ethnic group.

Jeanne Henry resident expert

Jeanne Henry, the Museum's Education Coordinator and resident Susanna Dickinson expert, sits with Margaret Jacob, member of Jeanne's pioneer quilting bee group. Margaret displays her latest creation: a postage stamp doll quilt.

What followed is a rich history in this state’s development and important contributions to the history of the entire United States. This exhibit presents many compelling insights into how much of today’s Texan culture is due to this community’s comment to their new home.

Laura Esparza

Laura Esparza, Manager of the History, Arts & Nature Division of The City of Austin Parks & Recreation Department, views an old map of Texas prepared in German to help promote the New Republic to German immigrants.

Joyce Aldridge dressed as Susanna Dickinson

Joyce Aldridge dressed as Susanna Dickinson sits next to an actual piece of furniture recently donated to the Museum by Susanna Dickinson's third great granddaughter, Dye Lumen Fled. The chest has been in the family for three generations, approximately 140 years.

Herlinda Zamora

Herlinda Zamora, manager of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center and her friend Kat dropped by to  view the new exhibit. Herlinda is also a professional curator and designs our many exhibits at the ESB-MACC.

steroscopic viewer

Visitors could also enjoy the Museum's own stereoscopic viewer with images of old Austin landmarks.

Susanna Dickinson Museum

About the Joseph and Susanna Dickinson Hannig Museum.

The museum’s mission is to preserve the home and legacy of Alamo Survivor Susanna Dickinson, and to celebrate Texas’ historical heritage by providing programs and educational resources to the citizens of Austin and its visitors. We cordially invite you to visit Wednesday through Sunday, noon – 5:00 pm

Free Admission

For more information on all of our facilities please visit our Blog

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Oct 19, 2012 - 02:28 pm CDT

The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center (ESB-MACC) celebrated its fifth anniversary in its new building.

Saturday, October the 13th 2012

Together with honored guests and dedicated staff,  The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center (ESB-MACC) celebrated its fifth anniversary in its new building. The ESB-MACC itself was decades in the making. Members of the public, the MACC's Advisory Board, City officials and the ESB-MACC’s staff all helped to put Austin’s Mexican American Community's achievements into perspective.

5th anniversary celebration

Representatives of our community included: Bert Lumbreras, Assistant City Manager, Lloyd Doggett, U.S. Congressman, Sara Hensley, CPRP, Director, Austin Parks & Recreation Department, Juan Oyervides ESM-MACC Advisory Board, Chair and Laura Esparza, History, Arts & Nature division manager who has overseen the ESB-MACC since its completion and served as our master of ceremonies. Also speaking at the ceremonies was Gloria Pennington, who has been involved with many of the programmed events during these past five years.

photo of city officials

Gonzalo Barrientos, Former Texas State Senator, Mike Martinez, Council Member Place 2, Sara Hensley, CPRP, Director, Austin Parks & Recreation Department, Bert Lumbreras, Assistant City Manager, and Herlinda Zamora, ESB-MACC manager.

Guest at the celebrations

Victor Ovalle, Austin Parks & Recreation Department's Public Information Officer and Gonzalo Barrientos, Former Texas State Senator.

L. esparza, Lloyd Doggett, Herlinda Zamora

Laura Esparza, Division Manager, Lloyd Doggett, U.S.. Congressman and Herlinda Zamora ESB-MACC's manager

Audience at MACC event

Our honored guests.

Tiffany Moreno at our welcome table expalnning the ESB-MACC many programing and classes opportunities.

Tiffany Moreno, our Education Coordinator, at our welcome table explaining the ESB-MACC many programming and classes opportunities.

Photo of ESB-MACC with banners of past exhibits

Display of banners from past five years of exhibits.

Lacey Richter, Arts instructor in education area

One of our talented Arts Instructors, Lacey Richter explaining the multi-faceted ESB-MACC arts programming. On the table are commemorative gift bags and information on the ESB-MACC's programs and classes.

Table from the Resistencia Bookstore founded by Raul Salinas an early advocate fro the ESB-MACC

A display table, knowledgeably and gracefully manned by Lila Rosas, from the Resistencia Bookstore, founded by the late poet Raul Salina, an early advocate for the ESB-MACC.

 

Juan Oyervides, ESB-MACC Advsory Board Chair

Juan Oyervides, ESB-MACC Advisory Board Chair, provided an inspirational message for the future.

Linda Crocket and Paloma Mayorga

Two members of our dedicated ESB-MACC team, Linda Irizarry-Crockett, Education & Event Coordinator and Paloma Mayorga, Administrative Assistant, take a moment for a quick photo.

Visitng Mexican artisans and artist Margareta Cabrera

Visiting Mexican artisans Lucila Sosa Luria (far left) and her husband, Ranulfo Sergio Santiago Ibañez (far right) with their two children together with Margarita Cabrera, the ESB-MACC's first artist in residence.

L Espaza and Gloria Pennington

Laura Esparza and Gloria Pennington display their traditional huipiles set against the ESB-MACC very own Mexican Zócalo.

Margarita Cabrera’s “Suenos Desarraigados" (Uprooted Dreams)

Additionally this was the unveiling of Margarita Cabrera’s “Suenos Desarraigados" (Uprooted Dreams) innovative art installation. Part of the Austin Arts in Public Places program (AAPP), this colorful installation was created together with members of the Austin immigrant community as part the MACC’s core mission.

For more information on Margarita's installation, please see our blog post

group of artists

Margarita Cabrera and her group of artists

margarita and aztec dancers

Margarita and Aztec dancers

Margarita and collaborators and their guests at the ribbon cutting.

Margarita, project collaborators and their guests at the ribbon cutting ceremony.

Sculptures from the enrty way to the ESB-MACC's Educational Wing

Installation of sculptures in the entry way to the ESB-MACC's educational wing.

Mexican art work

A close up look (before installation) of one of the several imaginative wooden sculptures included in the actual installation.

Video presentation a

After viewing the new art installation, we were treated to two videos describing the process that went into the creation and fabrication of the pieces.

The event featured great entertainment: one of the trademarks of ESB-MACC programming.

We had great entertainment by Susana Torres Y Conjunto Clemencia. Susana and Clemencia have become favorites of our audiences. Their Tejano music really resonates with our central Texan roots. This is part of our authentic local music and fits right in with the Austin vibe. The dance group “Danza Azteca Guadalupana” was involved in the art project at several key moments and helped add a historic and authentic Mexican cultural component to the festive atmosphere.

Susana Torres Y Conjunto Clemencia. Susana and Clemencia

Always a great performance by Susana Torres Y Conjunto Clemencia.

Danza Azteca Guadalupana

Also appearing, the dance group, Danza Azteca Guadalupana.

Danza Azteca Guadalupana

Danza Azteca Guadalupana.

Actual transcripts of two very inspirational presentations from ESB-MACC celebration.

Gloria Pennington's commemorative address

Laura Esparza, and Gloria Pennington

It seems as if it were only yesterday that I was at the opening of this center on September 15, 2007 and spoke of the beautiful dream that had finally come true.  I remember recalling the work of the early visionaries, community leaders and artists and their efforts to make that dream a reality.  Outlining the steps the City of Austin took in response to those efforts, the Task Force and Board that was appointed, the studies conducted, the bond elections held, and finally the selection of this beautiful location and an architect.

The architect was Teodoro Gonzalez de León and when he spoke on that day, he stated, “I thought of a white building in the shape of a half moon crescent, looking onto the lake.  The crescent, which comprises spaces for workshops, teaching activities and exhibitions, forms an ensemble with three triangular volumes, housing a multipurpose hall and two theaters, as well as a cylinder meant to act as an urban beacon signaling the entrance from the street.  All those shapes made of white concrete mixed with pieces of white marble, and chiseled by Mexican hands.” In closing he stated “For me, the ultimate goal of architecture is to create places where people can congregate, spaces of communication and dialogue.”  His was a wonderful accomplishment.

Now, five years later, I can add to those memories the thousands of people with eyes to the second floor balcony, where the Consul General of Mexico gives the Grito during the Fiesta de Independencia. The zócalo crowded with hundreds and hundreds of people enjoying the music of iconic as well as young Latino musicians and happy people painting and creating art during classes with Fidencio Duran or during special project like “Uprooted Dreams” with Margarita Cabrera.  This place is becoming a mecca for the creation, documentation, and depository of Latino art and culture.

As I look into the future, I visualize a place teeming with people, with doors open to all in the community as we perpetuate, nurture, and promote the beauty, creativity, and wonder of our art, of our culture. So, that the dream can continue – UN Sueno Bonito.

Gloria Pennington, Austin Parks And Recreation Department, Public Information Office

Herlinda Zamora's Opening Address

Herlinda Zamora and the ESB-MACC staff

Herlinda Zamora and the dedicated ESB-MACC staff

Thank you all for being here today, to reflect on our accomplishments over the past 5 years. There was no event committee, no sub-committee, or any committee that worked on today's event. It was the talent, passion, and dedication of my staff that worked so hard in organizing today's activities. Let's give them a hand for putting in much sweat and enthusiasm preparing for today's event. I also want to thank our volunteers, performers, and photographer Fastinus Deraet for being part of this special occasion.

Scholar of Chicano and US Latino art, Tomas Ybarra Frausto has stated that Cultural Centers are "Guardians of Culture." A seed was planted over 30 years ago, and the dream and desire to preserve our culture has not ended. We continue to nurture our community by providing inspirational experiences and interdisciplinary programming, which includes dance, theater, music, and the visual arts.  We must never forget the historical significance of all the opportunities that our community has built for the future of our youth, and the cultural values our community nurtures every day at the Center.  And with this international architectural icon, which symbolizes the past, present and future we help make Austin the World Class City that it is.

I know we are doing our job when we start seeing familiar faces consistently attending our events. Since our grand opening our event attendance numbers have amazingly grown, we have worked with over 75 collaborators, and our educational programs have doubled. We have two exhibit spaces that have highlighted the works of over 800 artists and over 40 exhibits. Since becoming the manager, I've been blessed with a wonderful staff with a range of specialties who is COMMITTED TO the mission of the CENTER.

Herlinda Zamora, Manager of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center

A message from Teodoro Gonzáles de León, world known architect and esteemed member of the team that designed the ESB-MACC.

A message to Austin, October 13, 2012

My friends,

From Tenochtitlan, receive the greetings of Teodoro González de León; greetings and congratulations on the fifth anniversary of the Mexican American Cultural Center.

Twelve years ago, in 2000, in the good company of our friend –now gone– Gabriel Martín del Campo, and dear Jaime Beaman, in my awkward English, we explained our architectural intentions to the representatives of the Mexican Community. The stars were auspicious and we were chosen to develop the project and, in December of that same year, we presented the conceptual design to the consideration of the whole Community: a crescent shaped building –which comprised the museum and classrooms– and embraced a plaza –the zócalo– a space for events looking onto the lake; as well as three triangular prisms housing a multipurpose hall and two theaters. The project pleased and was accepted, but seven years had to go by to raise funds and build the first phase: half of the white crescent shaped building, with the plaza overlooking the lake, and the triangular volume holding the multipurpose hall. All the exterior walls and sun-breakers were made of white concrete prefabricated panels, hand chiseled by Mexican workers (made in Tenochtitlan and brought to Austin). This is a finish that I invented, which stands the test of time, and has a texture that reveals the human imprint of its craftsmanship.

I wish long life to the MACC and also hope for its completion.

Amigas y amigos:

Reciban desde Tenochtitlán un saludo de Teodoro González de León; un saludo y una felicitación los cinco años de vida del Mexican American Cultural Center.

Hace doce años, en el año 2000, con la buena compañía del amigo –ya desaparecido– Gabriel Martín del Campo y del querido Jaime Beaman, con mi torpe inglés, explicamos nuestras intenciones arquitectónicas a los representantes de la Comunidad Mexicana. Las estrellas se juntaron y nos escogieron para desarrollar el proyecto y, en diciembre del mismo año, presentamos el diseño conceptual a la consideración de toda la Comunidad: un edificio en forma de media luna  -que contenía el museo y aulas-  y abrazaba una plaza  -un zócalo-  para eventos, con vista al lago, y tres prismas triangulares que contenían un salón de usos múltiples y dos teatros. El proyecto gustó y fue aceptado, pero tuvieron que pasar siete años para obtener los recursos y construir la primera etapa: un edificio blanco, con una plaza viendo al lago, con la mitad de la media luna y el volumen triangular del salón multiusos. Todos sus muros exteriores y parteluces son paneles prefabricados de concreto blanco, cincelados a mano, por obreros mexicanos (fabricados en Tenochtitlán y traídos a Austin). Es un acabado inventado por mí, que resiste el paso del tiempo y una textura que revela la mano humana de su manufactura.

Deseo larga vida al MACC y hago votos por la segunda etapa.

About the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center

If you have not yet visited the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center, you are in for a treat.  Our magnificent facility was designed by world known architect Teodoro Gonzales de León and is a visually spectacular addition to our Parks and Recreation Department’s cultural facilities.

MACC at night

Keep up-to-date on our events through the City’s events calendar and the ESB-MACC's own website: www.MACCAustin.org. 

Please don’t hesitate to stop by and enjoy our art, theater, classes and family fun.

 

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Oct 16, 2012 - 03:10 pm CDT

During an official City Hall ceremony, Representatives with Austin Parks & Recreation Department Presented their 2012 Awards to our much appreciated Partners in the Arts and Humanities Recipients.

Photo showing award

Parks & Recreation Department Director, Sara L. Hensley, CPRP, Laura Esparza, Division Manager of the History, Art and Nature Division and Russell Wiseman, Culture and Arts Education Manager for the Dougherty Arts Center

Parks & Recreation Department Director, Sara L. Hensley, CPRP, Laura Esparza, Division Manager of the History, Art and Nature Division and Russell Wiseman, Culture and Arts Education Manager for the Dougherty Arts Center.

October 11, 2012, Austin, Texas,

Mayor, Lee Leffingwell, Austin Parks & Recreation Department Director, Sara L. Hensley, CPRP, Laura Esparza, Division Manager of the History, Art and Nature Division and Russell Wiseman, Culture and Arts Education Manager for the Dougherty Arts Center participated in celebrating October which is National Arts and Humanities Month.  This is a coast-to-coast collective celebration of culture, arts and humanities in America.  It has become the largest annual celebration of the arts and humanities in the nation.  The History, Art and Nature Division of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department took this opportunity to recognize several individuals, businesses and organizations for their outstanding contribution to the arts in Austin during this past year. 

This year’s nominations were groups and individuals who went above and beyond in helping our museums, cultural centers and natural treasures reach their full potential.

On behalf of The Elisabet Ney Museum

Officials with Lynn Hill

The Elisabet Ney Museum would like to honor S. Lynn Hill.  Lynn has been a consistent weekly volunteer at the Elisabet Ney Museum since January of this year.  While, it has only been six months, S. Lynn Hill, a Master Naturalist and Urban Habitat Steward, has brought knowledge and passion for the environment to the Ney Museum.  This has created very positive results for the prairie restoration project.  She shares not only her time and expertise, but she also shares her knowledge and love for native plants and seeds.  Lynn also acted as an expert during the Ney Museum’s Urban Birds event.  Lynn is a great asset to the museum and to the greater Austin community.  Thank you, Lynn for you commitment to the Ney Museum and the citizens of Austin.

On behalf of The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center

officials with Dr Aolle Johnson

The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center would like to recognize Dr. Allen Johnson.  This is a man with a mission, a proud mission.  For the past five years Dr. Johnson has been developing the Carver Centers’ Genealogy Workshop Series.  He has brought it to the attention of local citizens interested in connecting with their past and he has brought the Carver Center to national visibility by guiding those who are interested in learning and saving their own past.  Dr. Johnson is the Carver’s resident genealogist, conducting the monthly workshop meetings with various related topics on genealogy.   This job takes a lot of time and a lot of patience.  He gives that and more.  His quiet intelligent manner always wins the day because he knows that tomorrow will bring new challenges to the great reward of learning what one’s heritage is.  He knows there is nothing like knowing, appreciating and sharing your own family history. Thank you Dr. Johnson for helping us to have a better understanding of ourselves.

officials with William Brown

The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center would also like to recognize William Brown.  William is a junior at Westlake High School.  He came to the George Washington Carver Museum because he had heard about the Carver’s Broadway Bound Performing Arts Camp.  William was too old to register for the camp, so he offered to voluntarily design the lights.  William spends at least 20 hours a week for six weeks at the museum designing, hanging, circuiting, gelling and running the lights for the show.  He is a bright young man who offered his talent and time freely. Thank you William, for your generous spirit and hard work.  We really appreciate you!

On behalf of The Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater

John Faulk, Mac Ragsdale, David Malish

The History, Art and Nature Division of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department would also like to recognize John Faulk, Mac Ragsdale and David Malish.  These three gentlemen made generous donations of time and other resources in the renovation of the backstage area of the Zilker Hillside Theater.  Thanks to these gentlemen and the businesses they represent, the Zilker Hillside Theater’s backstage area has been increased by roughly twice the space that it used to be.  The foundations for a green room, offices and rehearsal rooms backstage have been laid and extensive storage under the stage has been created.  This improvement will serve not only the Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater’s co-sponsored groups: Zilker Theater Productions and the Austin Shakespeare Festival, but also all of the Theater’s many renters.  Thank you very much.   

Flintco LCC.

The History, Art and Nature Division of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department would like to recognize Flintco LLC represented by John A. Martin, Mike Hutter, Peter Narvarte and Mark Pearce.  Flintco was instrumental in the development of the backstage renovation of the Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater in Zilker Park.  Their good work will ensure high quality programming on a grander scale for many years to come.  The citizens of Austin will find a bigger and better environment both onstage, backstage and in the audience as a result of Flintco’s generosity.  This will allow the Hillside Theater’s Co-sponsors and renters to attempt more challenging productions which will result in a better quality and more engaging experience for all of Austin’s citizens when they attend the Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater.  Thank you to one and all. This was a marvelous example of a public private partnership that will benefit Austin for literally years to come.  We would like to extend our sincere thanks to everyone involved for your vision, your expertise and your commitment to Austin.  Thank you.

On behalf of The O. Henry Museum

Clay Smith from Texas Book Festival

The O. Henry Museum is recognizing the Texas Book Festival, Lidia Agraz, Executive Director.  The Texas Book Festival was represented by Clay Smith.  The Texas Book Festival has been an important collaborator with the O. Henry Museum for the past two years. The Book Festival has provided authors to participate in museum programming; promoted museum offerings like the Short Story Master Class and Coolest Book Club in the World, and co-sponsored museum events such as the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories anthology publication celebration. The Texas Book Festival has helped elevate the image of the O. Henry Museum and in turn, enhanced the literary arts community in Austin.  Thanks to the Texas Book Festival for promoting literacy and the O.Henry Museum.

On behalf of The Zilker Botanical Garden

Austin Area Garden Council winners

The Zilker Botanical Garden would like to honor the Austin Area Garden Council for their significant contributions to the improvement of the botanical garden.  Joining us were Garden Center President Donna Freidenreich, Ed Parker, project coordinator for the Taniguchi Japanese Garden, Christie Rogers, project coordinator for the Woodland Fern bed and Mark Berthiaume.  In particular, “AAGC” contributed significant infrastructure improvements to the pond system in and around the Taniguchi Japanese Garden.  This saves water and enhances the appearance of the tranquil Japanese-inspired garden.  Additionally, one of the AAGC member garden clubs, The Garden Club of Austin, contributed a new Woodland Fern Bed, first, by clearing invasive species, then by installing a stream bed, irrigation and a variety of ferns for this new public exhibit.  The Parks and Recreation Department extends our most sincere appreciation for the Austin Area Garden Center’s creativity, work, and contribution to improve the experience for citizens and visitors to the Zilker Botanical Garden.

Group photo of recipients for the 2012 Partners in the Arts and Humanities Award

Group photo

For information on any of our Museum, Cultural Centers and Nature & Science Centers, please see our blog.

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Oct 04, 2012 - 11:38 am CDT

ESB-MACC Presents an Exhibit by José Antonio Garcíaguerra

The current show at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center is an outstanding example of one artist’s quest to create meaningful works of art, both beautiful and historic. This is a great way to communicate one’s pride in country and appreciation of nature.

photo of exhibit

Now on exhibit through November 24th, 2012. Don’t miss it!

opening wall at exhibit

 

eagels

Description of José Antonio Garcíaguerra’s work: (Translation by Paloma Mayorga)

The work presented by the artist is made up of graphite drawings and bronze sculptures, which were created using the method of “lost wax”. This method represents elements involved in the Independence of Mexico, such as the Bell of Dolores with which the Mexican people were called to arms. The drawings are of heroes of the same fight for independence, like Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, José María Morelos y Pavón, La Corregidora Doña Josefa Ortíz de Domínguez, and Ignacio Allende; as well as the Cathedral of Saltillo and the Landín Chapel, which are symbols of the religious devotion of the Mexican people during that time. The work also consists of emblems like carts and carriages, characters like “El Escribano” (the letter writer), and the weapons that were utilized during the Independence of Mexico.

photo of exhibit

 

photo of sculpture of Mexican indepedence bells

 

photo of sculpture

 

photo of sculpture

 

photo of sculpture

 

photo of graphic

 

photo of graphic

José Antonio Garcíaguerra’s Biography

Herlinda Zamora the artist and Gloria Pennigton

Photo of Herlinda Zamora, The ESB-MACC's manger, the artist, José Antonio Garcíaguerra holding the poster he designed for this year's Diez y Seis Celebration and Gloria Pennington

From Saltillo, Mexico, José Antonio Garcíaguerra was passionate about drawing, painting, and sculpting from the beginning. Autodidactic and mature in his style, he has mastered the technique of bronze sculpting, and he manages to extract significant detail from reality in order to achieve the beauty in his sculptures. He defines his work as realism, and utilizes the “lost wax technique” to depict the fauna and horses of northern Mexico that he is so passionate about. These, as well as the nude female figures he also sculpts, exemplify his characteristic style

The realism in the work of J.A. Garcíaguerra is based on a large body of documentation, appreciation, and elaboration of sketches, photos, and close observation of movements and habits. He has participated in important exhibitions in both Mexico and abroad, and has received positive reviews such as from Rocio Castelo Perrín, a graduate of law and visual arts and a critic in art history, and who is the principle director of art workshops for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Monterrey, Mexico. Castelo Perrín has described the work of Garcíaguerra below:

“The understanding and sensibility toward all living forms of nature combined with a precocious ability for drawing has allowed José Antonio Garcíaguerra from a very young age to give expression to the world that moves him.

The Wax in his hands became the moldable tool with which he, like any sculptor, translates emotions into forms. The artist presents vivid contrasts between the vigorous dramatism of the animal world and a gentle vision of the feminine nude. José Antonio elegantly achieves sculpting the feminine nude to show their forms with simplicity and purity; it is a sensuality that translates a natural lack of pretension.

In his works with animals, the intelligent and lively look of the eagle shows daring and strength. The horses’ muscles become speed that the bronze holds and gives back to the spectators’ eyes in its sculpted lines which intertwine with rhythm and harmony. His pieces, all made with the ancient ‘lost wax’ technique, transmit, to those who are observant, the nobility, as shown in their eyes, of the dogs in their continuous wait, the delicate plasticity of the deer, or the untamed courage and strength of the bulls.

The bronzes of José Antonio Garcíaguerra are in that frontier territory in which nature end and reality becomes art… it is human creation.”

About the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center

If you have not yet visited the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center, you are in for a treat.  Our magnificent facility was designed by world known architect Theodoro Gonzales de Leon and is a visually spectacular addition to our Parks and Recreation Department’s cultural facilities.

MACC at night

Keep up-to-date on our events through the City’s events calendar and the ESB-MACC's own website: www.MACCAustin.org. 

Please don’t hesitate to stop by and enjoy our art, theater, classes and family fun.

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Sep 19, 2012 - 11:21 am CDT

Once again, the dedicated staff at the ESB-MACC together with the City of Austin put on another great event.

Approximately 2,500 to 3,000 Austin citizens and visitors came to this year’s free celebration. First there was an exhibition by the Association de Charros El Herradero y Escaramuza El Rosario (the original Texan Cowboys).  Our fiesta’s musical entertainment started with Mariachi Tamazula , plus singer Ernesto Cadena Segovia (also Saltillo). The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen is an ESB-MACC repeat favorite. Their costumes and skills remind us how diverse Texas culture is. Many musical and dance influences show up in their captivating performances.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012

From southern Spain with its Moorish influence to the German immigrants of the 19th century, Tejano culture is a rich mixture of many traditions. 

The evening closed with Mariachi Nueva Generacion from Texas State University.  Adding to the festivities, were participating food booths that were set up to provide delicious Mexican dishes and cold drinks.

This is one the ESB-MACC’s major mission – providing Tejanos, Mexican Americans and resident Mexicans a place of their own and a symbol of ethnic pride.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 view from balcony

Every evening on September the 15th for the last five years, the ESB-MACC, The City of Austin, the Consul General of Mexico, and the Fiesta de Independencia Foundation proudly present our citizens an official Dies y Seis Celebration.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 welcome table

Our welcome table with all the ESB-MACC programming, classes and events.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012

We take great pride in emulating the actual celebrations taking place all over Mexico on this evening. Like government officials all over Mexico, Austin’s own Consul General of Mexico, Rosella Ojeda, graciously provides the traditional “El Grito” or “call for independence.

Delivered from the traditional “El Balcon de la Independencies”, just like Hidalgo (the father of Mexican independence) decried freedom and “Viva Mexico” in 1810. We decorate our balcony, overlooking our own Zacalo (Mexican plaza) with a large bell to complete the authentic experience.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012

Our great food court

 

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Gloria and Herlinda

The City of Austin’s Gloria Mata Pennington, and ESB-MACC Herlind Zamora.

We at the ESB-MACC want to thank the City of Austin’s Gloria Mata Pennington for her decades of dedication and expertise in helping make our city a more inclusive and enjoyable place to live. Gloria’s in depth knowledge of protocol has helped us all in piecing together the city’s important & meaningful events. Equal gratitude was shown to Gus Garcia, our former mayor and tireless advocate for all of Austin’s residents.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 shot of building

ESB-MACC is the perfect place for community get together.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012, VIP room

ESB-MACC VIP room for community guests and visitors from Mexico.

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, stage

The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen performing Tejano Dances.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen performing Traditional Mexican dances.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

Folkloric dancers

 

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, stage

 

mariachi band

 

folklorica dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 US and Texan Flag

The US and Texan Flags were presented by Tejanos in Action Color Guard.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Mexican flag passed

The Mexican flag was then presented to the Consul General by Tejanos in Action Color Guard.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Mexican National anthem sung

Ernesto Cadena Segovia, a well-respected singer, also from Saltillo, helped complete our authentic celebration with singing the Mexican National Anthem after the ringing of the our representational “campana”( independence bell). Gloria said “People tell me they have never heard the Mexican National Anthem sung any better than Ernesto did.” Ernesto, his father, sister, niece and grandniece all made the celebration even more authentic.

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Gloria and Ernesto

Gloris and our Guest from Saltillo, Ernesto Cadena Segovia who sang the Mexican National Anthem.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Gloria and Mexican Consul General Rosalba Ojeda

Gloria and Austin's Mexican Consul General Rosalba Ojeda.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 visiting sculptor Jose Antonio Garciaguerra

Adding to the evening’s celebrations were honored guests from Austin’s sister city, Saltillo, in Coahuila, Mexico. José Antonio Garciaguerra was in attendance. He is the noted Mexican sculptor whose exhibit currently graces our main gallery (and a permanent example of his work adorns the entry to our main auditorium.)

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Ernesto and guests

Ernesto Cadena Segovia and his; wife, father, sister, her daughter and grand daughter.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Former mayor Gus Garcia

Gus Garcia, our former mayor his wife and friends.

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Lloyd Dogget

 US Representative Lloyd Dogget dropped by our celebration to urge everyone to come out on election day and vote.

MACC courtyard with projection on wall

For added convenience, free shuttles ran every fifteen minutes making the evening even more enjoyable. Visitors could leave behind the headache of finding parking, and ride the shuttle.

About the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center

If you have not yet visited the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center, you are in for a treat.  Our magnificent facility was designed by world known architect Theodoro Gonzales de Leon and is a visually spectacular addition to our Parks and Recreation Department’s cultural facilities.

MACC at night

Keep up-to-date on our events through the City’s events calendar and the ESB-MACC's own website: www.MACCAustin.org. 

Please don’t hesitate to stop by and enjoy our art, theater, classes and family fun.

Sep 14, 2012 - 11:48 am CDT

New Exhibit at theGeorge Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center, September 6 - January 5, 2013

Sculptural woodcarving is the preeminent traditional art form among the Yoruba. Yoruba woodcarvers are widely acknowledged for their superior craftsmanship. Known as “agbegi lere”  (carver of wood-figures), Yoruba woodcarvers are held in high esteem within their society.

african art, wood carving, exhibit

ÈRE is a Yoruba term that means “sculpture” or “statuary”. More precisely, as used in the title of this exhibition, ÈRE encapsulates the art genre of the Yoruba Master Carvers and summarizes the plurality of Yoruba statuary as secular, utilitarian, architectural, and spiritual. The transcendental import of its duality as sacred object and spirit signify the physical manifestation of a Yoruba worldview.

african art, wood carving, exhibit photo

Traditional Art

ÉRE, the core of this two-part exhibition entails outstanding sculptures by three globally renowned Yoruba master carvers: Olowe of Ise (1875-1938), Dada Areogun of Osi-IIorin (1880-1954), and Bamgboye ofOdo-Owa (1893-1978). These artists were mostly commissioned by Yoruba royalty, religious organizations, and wealthy patrons to produce household and religious objects, such as doors, veranda posts, and ceremonial carvings. Their aesthetic expressions are predicated on the traditional Yoruba concept of beautification known as oju-ona. Oju-ona signifies adornment of surfaces with traditional Yoruba motifs, patterns, and symbols.

Emphasis on elaborate surface embellishment and elegant geometric forms are distinguishing characteristics of Yoruba carving. The masterworks shown in ÉRE are analogous to poetry in their dynamic composition, rhythm, and harmony.

Featured Master Carvers of Traditional Yoruba Art now on exhibit are: Olowe of Ise, Dada Areogun, and Bamgboye of Odo-Owa.

 

african art, wood carving, artist lecture

Contemporary Yoruba Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D discusses his work with Bernadette Phifer, Manager of the Carver.

african art

Contemporary Art

REFLECTIONS, features the art of Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D., whose artwork is mostly influenced by his experience and knowledge of traditional Yoruba art, including an early apprenticeship in Yoruba woodcarving. The highly textured surface and profuse use of traditional Yoruba patterns and symbols in his oeuvre, especially in his low-relief sculpture, is reminiscent of the stylistic approach of the Yoruba masterworks of Olowe, Areogun, and Bamgboye.

african art, wood carving

Contemporary Yoruba woodcarving by Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D

african art, wood carving

 

african art, wood carving

Traditional Yoruba Art now on exhibit with pieces by: Olowe of Ise, Dada Areogun, and Bamgboye of Odo-Owa.

african art, wood carving

Contemporary Yoruba woodcarving by Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D

african art, artist lecture

Photos from our Artist's Talk, held on Sept. 13th, 2012.  Contemporary Yoruba Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D. discussed his work,shown above.  The artist dedicates this exhibit to the participants in the Greater Tomorrow Youth Art Program.

Dec 10, 2012 - 11:07 am CST

In 2009, the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Advisory Board established the Award of Excellence. This recognition is for those individuals and groups that have demonstrated significant leadership and have made meaningful contributions in Latino cultural arts.

The Award of Excellence is to be granted as the highest distinction and celebration of a lasting contribution, artistic excellence and dedication, or leadership with distinguished service and outstanding performance.

This year’s nominees for the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center’s Award of Excellence are nominated by their peers for their significant leadership and contributions in Latino cultural arts. This year’s nominees are:

Mr. Dan Arellano

The Latino Theater Alliance (ALTA)

Mr. Johnny Degollado

Mr. Manuel “Cowboy” Donley

Mr. Alfredo Estrada

Ms. Gloria “La Tejana” Morales

Mr. Anthony Ortiz, Jr.

Mr. Juan Jose Sanchez

Mr. Miguel Angel Santana

Mr. Raul Valdez

and

Ms. Claudia Zapata

We congratulate and thank all of our nominees for their outstanding work. Your contributions do not go unrecognized.

 

And the winners are:

 

The Service category of the Award is for those who have exhibited outstanding service in the Latino cultural arts. The winner for this year is Claudia Zapata, one of Austin’s well-known curators, whose innovative exhibitions and educational programming has been featured at the Mexic-Arte Museum, the Serie Project, and Esperanza Peace and Justice Center. Check out her recently founded Chingozine for local news in the Latino art scene.

Our Patronage Award goes to Alfredo Estrada for his significant contributions in support of the Latino cultural arts. Alfredo is the founding editor of Latino magazine, and is also behind the nonprofit organization No Mas Hambre that last year alone collected over 1,000 pounds of food for the Capital Area Food Bank. He organizes the annual Nuestro Futuro Latino Education conference in Washington D.C., and has generously allowed two students to attend a summer camp at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on scholarship.

Our Emerging Artist category represents those age 15-25 who have shown innovative and exceptional accomplishments in the Latino cultural arts. Our winner this year is Anthony Ortiz Jr., who has mastered accordion and has played with his father and grandfather in their band Mariachi Corbetas, as well as shared the stage with Hank Williams Jr. and Julio Inglesias. Having been recognized with Resolution Number 1988 from the Texas House of Representatives and won several awards, he currently teaches accordion classes at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center and is highly regarded as a role model to his students.

 

 

Emerging Artist Anthony Ortiz Jr. accepting his Award of Excellence from Austin City Council member Laura Morrison.

 

 

In the area of Theater, our winner is the Austin Latino Theater Alliance (ALTA). Operating for 14 years with the mission of uniting and supporting the different Latino and Hispanic theater groups in Austin, ALTA works to foster the development of new talents in the theater arts, promote collaborative productions among local and international artists, and bring the highest quality theater to Austin’s Latino and Hispanic communities with Hispanic and Latin American productions that transcend borders and unite different groups and audiences.

Our Lifetime Achievement Award in the Visual Arts goes to Raul Valdez, who has been an active leader in the Latino community for decades. He is an artist, teacher, and advocate and some of his most notable murals can be found on school walls throughout Austin, including the University of Texas School of Social Work, and the A.B. Cantu Pan-American Recreation Center. He has become a symbol of what the arts can do for the public when they are supported.

For the Lifetime Achievement Award in Music, the selection committee felt that Johnny Degollado and Manuel “Cowboy” Donley equally deserved this award. As one of Austin’s leading conjunto accordionists, Johnny Degollado y Su Conjunto has promoted conjunto music in Austin and has written over 200 songs and recorded over 350. Johnny was inducted into the Tejano Music Hall of Fame in 1986, and has been the event coordinator for the Austin Conjunto Festival for 20 years. Listen to a sample of his music here.

 

 

Johnny Degollado accepting his Lifetime Achievement Award of Excellence from Austin City Council member Laura Morrison.

 

 

Our second recipient for the Lifetime Achievement Award in Music is Manuel “Cowboy” Donley. Known by many as the “Godfather of Tejano Music,” Donley has been a pioneer and innovator, combining traditional Mexican sounds with rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm-and-blues, and big band swing in his orquesta, Las Estrellas. Like Johnny Degollado, Manuel was inducted into the Tejano Music Hall of Fame in 1986 and has had a neighborhood park named after him by the City of Austin. The Governor of Texas announced a Proclamation in Manuel’s honor last year. Manuel continues his contributions to Tejano music and his community by teaching guitar lessons at Huston-Tillotson College and at his own home.

Manuel “Cowboy” Donley is pictured below alongside Herlinda Zamora and Linda Crockett in front of a painting by Alejandro Moreno Alanis. This painting is the first ever portrait of four related musical legends from the Guerrero and Donley families of East Austin: Ramon Guerrero Donley, his cousin, Longinos “Lonnie” Guerrero; Lonnie’s son, Luis “Louie” Guerrero, and Ramon’s son Manuel “Cowboy” Donley. The artwork was commissioned by Louie’s son, Sergio Guerrero and it was unveiled and presented by Alanis and the Texas Music Museum of Austin for the first time to Manuel “Cowboy” Donley on February 26, 2012. The Guerrero y Donley portrait was donated to the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on November 29th, 2012 to help continue the preservation of Mexican American cultural arts and heritage.

 

Manuel “Cowboy” Donley, recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award of Excellence, with Herlinda Zamora (Left) and Linda Crockett of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center.

 

Austin Arts and Parks
Nov 05, 2012 - 01:54 pm CST

George Washington Carver Museum & Cultural Center celebrated the Halloween spirit by hosting its 2012 Pumpkin Carving Event.

Pumpkin Carving and Festive Costumes

George Washington Carver Museum and Culture Center held festive activities on Saturday, October 27, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Carver’s Northside dock.

Pumpkin Carving on the Dock volunteers and participants in the costume contest display and show off their spooktacular outfits. Free face painting, music, food was offered.  A fun time was had by all who attended.  Photo by Carver Staff.

George Washington Carver museum pumpkin carving

We had a great turnout and from these photos you can see that the whole community enjoys carving pumpkins!

pumkin carving

 

pumpkin carving

 

pumpkin carving

 

pumpkin carving

About The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center

The george Washington carver Museum and Cultural center

The Center is located at 1165 Angelina St. Austin, Texas, 78702

Tel: (512) 974-4926 or visit www. CarverMuseum.org

 

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Austin Arts and Parks
Nov 02, 2012 - 02:46 pm CDT

The 2012 Halloween Howl at the Austin Nature and Science Center was an overwhelming success!

We had nearly 700 people show up to our evening event. This year, families met a live owl, snake, lizard, bat, hissing cockroach and other animals. Participants hiked the Zilker Preserve by moonlight, visited our planetarium and learned something new in our mad scientist's lab. Over 150 families stopped by to take pictures in our new Nature Photo booth. Many families commented that they don't often have opportunities to take family photos, and our photo booth gave them a fun opportunity to do so. Feedback we received was very positive all around. Because of our new "activity pass" system, families had more time to explore our booths and spent less time waiting in line. Halloween Howl gets better every year!

Graphic of poster for Halloween Howl

Halloween lighting

The Austin Nature and Science Center’s grounds were festooned with festive Halloween lighting.

Maragret as a blue butterfly

Margaret Russell dressed as a blue butterfly.

Halloween Howl visitors

Margaret Russell graciously greeted our guests.

Kathy maddox

ANSC's Kathy Maddox and Debra Windsor

vistors to the AN&SC

Our guests enjoyed our Science Center

Halloween Hawl visitor

Great history and nature - inspired costumes seemed to predominate the creative outfits for the evening.

photo booth

Something new this year: over 150 families stopped by to take pictures in our Nature Photo booth.

Barbara P. with lizard

ANSC's Barbara Peterson's live reptile display was a hit.

Insect display

On the trail outside we had more displays and activities. Our insect display was an interesting stop.

insect display

Hissing Cockroaches are always a draw.

bone display

How could Halloween be complete without a "bones" display?

Worm display

Our worm display lets kids create art with rubber worms dipped in paint. Then our guests discovered the important role worms play in our ecosystem.

planetarium

Our inflatable planetarium provided an interesting explanation of the night sky.

sand lot

Our sand box playground was a center for activity.

Reptile display

Our reptile, insect and fish exhibit gives great lessons about our nocturnal friends in the animal kingdom.

science experiment

Our new demonstration in our mad scientist's lab gave visitors a fun introduction to electricity and the science of how circuits work.

face painting

Face painting and tattoos were equally great hits with the kids.

facepainting

You could sense the fun ANSC's staff had with our visitors.

staff

Everybody seemed to be in the spirit of the Halloween.

live owl display

Our live animal presentations allowed guests to see animals like owls, which can usually only be heard, not seen in nature.

About The Austin Nature & Science Center

austinNature & science Center photo

The center is located at 301 Nature Center Drive, Austin, Texas, 78746

Admission is always free. The Center is open Mon. - Sat. 9 am - 5pm and Sunday Noon - 5pm

For more info on Programs, Classes and Summer Camps, please call (512)974-3888 or visit:

http://www.austintexas.gov/department/austin-nature-science-center

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Austin Arts and Parks
Oct 31, 2012 - 02:00 pm CDT

The Joseph and Susanna Dickinson Hannig Museum celebrated its newest exhibit with opening day festivities.

The exhibit which opened Saturday, October 20, will be on display through February 23, 2013.

Graphic for exhibit

German Band at opening day

The Polkadillos Band graciously performed for us. Their German music demonstrated the influences that the German community had on all of Texas.

Today's Tejano music still displays the strong German influence from over a century ago!

Susanna Dickinson and Joseph Hannig reenactors

The crowd enjoyed historic reenactors: Joyce Aldridge as Susanna Dickinson and Warren Fredrick as Joseph Hannig

Susanna Dickinson reenactors

October 20th, 2012

Our opening day events included: lecture by the renowned historian and curator, James L. Haley, informative performances by Susanna Dickinson & Joseph Hannig reenactors and live German music provided by the Polkadillos. We enjoyed perfect weather for our relaxing Saturday afternoon event. Guests enjoyed the entertainment and music while leisurely touring the museum.

Lawn game of Giant Chess pieces

A game of giant chess pieces in Brush Square.

German american society

German-Texan Heritage Society also had a table with information for our visitors.

The Museum's newest exhibit  “Joseph Hannig and the Texas Germans,” ex­plores the life of Joseph Han­nig and the impact of German settlement on Texas and the city of Austin.

entry way to museum

Entryway to the Museum and new exhibit.

opening display panel

Display panel in new exhibit.

new exhibit

new exhibit

 

bed quilt

Visitors admire period bed quilt.

exhibit panel

The exhibit spans over a century of German involvement in Texas. It describes their participation in taming this new land, from the first German to reach our shores to the thousands that followed. Christian Friedrich Dirks, who is generally considered the first German immigrant (he was actually on the run after stealing his benefactor’s postal receipts). After changing his name to Johann Friedrich Ernst, he received a land grant in Stephen F. Austin’s colony in 1831. From this safe haven, Ernst’s letters home, praising Tex­as as a paradise of freedom and plenty, were widely published and created a sensation. By the 1850s, more than 20,000 native Germans called Texas home, surpassing Hispanics as its largest ethnic group.

Jeanne Henry resident expert

Jeanne Henry, the Museum's Education Coordinator and resident Susanna Dickinson expert, sits with Margaret Jacob, member of Jeanne's pioneer quilting bee group. Margaret displays her latest creation: a postage stamp doll quilt.

What followed is a rich history in this state’s development and important contributions to the history of the entire United States. This exhibit presents many compelling insights into how much of today’s Texan culture is due to this community’s comment to their new home.

Laura Esparza

Laura Esparza, Manager of the History, Arts & Nature Division of The City of Austin Parks & Recreation Department, views an old map of Texas prepared in German to help promote the New Republic to German immigrants.

Joyce Aldridge dressed as Susanna Dickinson

Joyce Aldridge dressed as Susanna Dickinson sits next to an actual piece of furniture recently donated to the Museum by Susanna Dickinson's third great granddaughter, Dye Lumen Fled. The chest has been in the family for three generations, approximately 140 years.

Herlinda Zamora

Herlinda Zamora, manager of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center and her friend Kat dropped by to  view the new exhibit. Herlinda is also a professional curator and designs our many exhibits at the ESB-MACC.

steroscopic viewer

Visitors could also enjoy the Museum's own stereoscopic viewer with images of old Austin landmarks.

Susanna Dickinson Museum

About the Joseph and Susanna Dickinson Hannig Museum.

The museum’s mission is to preserve the home and legacy of Alamo Survivor Susanna Dickinson, and to celebrate Texas’ historical heritage by providing programs and educational resources to the citizens of Austin and its visitors. We cordially invite you to visit Wednesday through Sunday, noon – 5:00 pm

Free Admission

For more information on all of our facilities please visit our Blog

Tagged:
Austin Arts and Parks
Oct 19, 2012 - 02:28 pm CDT

The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center (ESB-MACC) celebrated its fifth anniversary in its new building.

Saturday, October the 13th 2012

Together with honored guests and dedicated staff,  The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center (ESB-MACC) celebrated its fifth anniversary in its new building. The ESB-MACC itself was decades in the making. Members of the public, the MACC's Advisory Board, City officials and the ESB-MACC’s staff all helped to put Austin’s Mexican American Community's achievements into perspective.

5th anniversary celebration

Representatives of our community included: Bert Lumbreras, Assistant City Manager, Lloyd Doggett, U.S. Congressman, Sara Hensley, CPRP, Director, Austin Parks & Recreation Department, Juan Oyervides ESM-MACC Advisory Board, Chair and Laura Esparza, History, Arts & Nature division manager who has overseen the ESB-MACC since its completion and served as our master of ceremonies. Also speaking at the ceremonies was Gloria Pennington, who has been involved with many of the programmed events during these past five years.

photo of city officials

Gonzalo Barrientos, Former Texas State Senator, Mike Martinez, Council Member Place 2, Sara Hensley, CPRP, Director, Austin Parks & Recreation Department, Bert Lumbreras, Assistant City Manager, and Herlinda Zamora, ESB-MACC manager.

Guest at the celebrations

Victor Ovalle, Austin Parks & Recreation Department's Public Information Officer and Gonzalo Barrientos, Former Texas State Senator.

L. esparza, Lloyd Doggett, Herlinda Zamora

Laura Esparza, Division Manager, Lloyd Doggett, U.S.. Congressman and Herlinda Zamora ESB-MACC's manager

Audience at MACC event

Our honored guests.

Tiffany Moreno at our welcome table expalnning the ESB-MACC many programing and classes opportunities.

Tiffany Moreno, our Education Coordinator, at our welcome table explaining the ESB-MACC many programming and classes opportunities.

Photo of ESB-MACC with banners of past exhibits

Display of banners from past five years of exhibits.

Lacey Richter, Arts instructor in education area

One of our talented Arts Instructors, Lacey Richter explaining the multi-faceted ESB-MACC arts programming. On the table are commemorative gift bags and information on the ESB-MACC's programs and classes.

Table from the Resistencia Bookstore founded by Raul Salinas an early advocate fro the ESB-MACC

A display table, knowledgeably and gracefully manned by Lila Rosas, from the Resistencia Bookstore, founded by the late poet Raul Salina, an early advocate for the ESB-MACC.

 

Juan Oyervides, ESB-MACC Advsory Board Chair

Juan Oyervides, ESB-MACC Advisory Board Chair, provided an inspirational message for the future.

Linda Crocket and Paloma Mayorga

Two members of our dedicated ESB-MACC team, Linda Irizarry-Crockett, Education & Event Coordinator and Paloma Mayorga, Administrative Assistant, take a moment for a quick photo.

Visitng Mexican artisans and artist Margareta Cabrera

Visiting Mexican artisans Lucila Sosa Luria (far left) and her husband, Ranulfo Sergio Santiago Ibañez (far right) with their two children together with Margarita Cabrera, the ESB-MACC's first artist in residence.

L Espaza and Gloria Pennington

Laura Esparza and Gloria Pennington display their traditional huipiles set against the ESB-MACC very own Mexican Zócalo.

Margarita Cabrera’s “Suenos Desarraigados" (Uprooted Dreams)

Additionally this was the unveiling of Margarita Cabrera’s “Suenos Desarraigados" (Uprooted Dreams) innovative art installation. Part of the Austin Arts in Public Places program (AAPP), this colorful installation was created together with members of the Austin immigrant community as part the MACC’s core mission.

For more information on Margarita's installation, please see our blog post

group of artists

Margarita Cabrera and her group of artists

margarita and aztec dancers

Margarita and Aztec dancers

Margarita and collaborators and their guests at the ribbon cutting.

Margarita, project collaborators and their guests at the ribbon cutting ceremony.

Sculptures from the enrty way to the ESB-MACC's Educational Wing

Installation of sculptures in the entry way to the ESB-MACC's educational wing.

Mexican art work

A close up look (before installation) of one of the several imaginative wooden sculptures included in the actual installation.

Video presentation a

After viewing the new art installation, we were treated to two videos describing the process that went into the creation and fabrication of the pieces.

The event featured great entertainment: one of the trademarks of ESB-MACC programming.

We had great entertainment by Susana Torres Y Conjunto Clemencia. Susana and Clemencia have become favorites of our audiences. Their Tejano music really resonates with our central Texan roots. This is part of our authentic local music and fits right in with the Austin vibe. The dance group “Danza Azteca Guadalupana” was involved in the art project at several key moments and helped add a historic and authentic Mexican cultural component to the festive atmosphere.

Susana Torres Y Conjunto Clemencia. Susana and Clemencia

Always a great performance by Susana Torres Y Conjunto Clemencia.

Danza Azteca Guadalupana

Also appearing, the dance group, Danza Azteca Guadalupana.

Danza Azteca Guadalupana

Danza Azteca Guadalupana.

Actual transcripts of two very inspirational presentations from ESB-MACC celebration.

Gloria Pennington's commemorative address

Laura Esparza, and Gloria Pennington

It seems as if it were only yesterday that I was at the opening of this center on September 15, 2007 and spoke of the beautiful dream that had finally come true.  I remember recalling the work of the early visionaries, community leaders and artists and their efforts to make that dream a reality.  Outlining the steps the City of Austin took in response to those efforts, the Task Force and Board that was appointed, the studies conducted, the bond elections held, and finally the selection of this beautiful location and an architect.

The architect was Teodoro Gonzalez de León and when he spoke on that day, he stated, “I thought of a white building in the shape of a half moon crescent, looking onto the lake.  The crescent, which comprises spaces for workshops, teaching activities and exhibitions, forms an ensemble with three triangular volumes, housing a multipurpose hall and two theaters, as well as a cylinder meant to act as an urban beacon signaling the entrance from the street.  All those shapes made of white concrete mixed with pieces of white marble, and chiseled by Mexican hands.” In closing he stated “For me, the ultimate goal of architecture is to create places where people can congregate, spaces of communication and dialogue.”  His was a wonderful accomplishment.

Now, five years later, I can add to those memories the thousands of people with eyes to the second floor balcony, where the Consul General of Mexico gives the Grito during the Fiesta de Independencia. The zócalo crowded with hundreds and hundreds of people enjoying the music of iconic as well as young Latino musicians and happy people painting and creating art during classes with Fidencio Duran or during special project like “Uprooted Dreams” with Margarita Cabrera.  This place is becoming a mecca for the creation, documentation, and depository of Latino art and culture.

As I look into the future, I visualize a place teeming with people, with doors open to all in the community as we perpetuate, nurture, and promote the beauty, creativity, and wonder of our art, of our culture. So, that the dream can continue – UN Sueno Bonito.

Gloria Pennington, Austin Parks And Recreation Department, Public Information Office

Herlinda Zamora's Opening Address

Herlinda Zamora and the ESB-MACC staff

Herlinda Zamora and the dedicated ESB-MACC staff

Thank you all for being here today, to reflect on our accomplishments over the past 5 years. There was no event committee, no sub-committee, or any committee that worked on today's event. It was the talent, passion, and dedication of my staff that worked so hard in organizing today's activities. Let's give them a hand for putting in much sweat and enthusiasm preparing for today's event. I also want to thank our volunteers, performers, and photographer Fastinus Deraet for being part of this special occasion.

Scholar of Chicano and US Latino art, Tomas Ybarra Frausto has stated that Cultural Centers are "Guardians of Culture." A seed was planted over 30 years ago, and the dream and desire to preserve our culture has not ended. We continue to nurture our community by providing inspirational experiences and interdisciplinary programming, which includes dance, theater, music, and the visual arts.  We must never forget the historical significance of all the opportunities that our community has built for the future of our youth, and the cultural values our community nurtures every day at the Center.  And with this international architectural icon, which symbolizes the past, present and future we help make Austin the World Class City that it is.

I know we are doing our job when we start seeing familiar faces consistently attending our events. Since our grand opening our event attendance numbers have amazingly grown, we have worked with over 75 collaborators, and our educational programs have doubled. We have two exhibit spaces that have highlighted the works of over 800 artists and over 40 exhibits. Since becoming the manager, I've been blessed with a wonderful staff with a range of specialties who is COMMITTED TO the mission of the CENTER.

Herlinda Zamora, Manager of the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center

A message from Teodoro Gonzáles de León, world known architect and esteemed member of the team that designed the ESB-MACC.

A message to Austin, October 13, 2012

My friends,

From Tenochtitlan, receive the greetings of Teodoro González de León; greetings and congratulations on the fifth anniversary of the Mexican American Cultural Center.

Twelve years ago, in 2000, in the good company of our friend –now gone– Gabriel Martín del Campo, and dear Jaime Beaman, in my awkward English, we explained our architectural intentions to the representatives of the Mexican Community. The stars were auspicious and we were chosen to develop the project and, in December of that same year, we presented the conceptual design to the consideration of the whole Community: a crescent shaped building –which comprised the museum and classrooms– and embraced a plaza –the zócalo– a space for events looking onto the lake; as well as three triangular prisms housing a multipurpose hall and two theaters. The project pleased and was accepted, but seven years had to go by to raise funds and build the first phase: half of the white crescent shaped building, with the plaza overlooking the lake, and the triangular volume holding the multipurpose hall. All the exterior walls and sun-breakers were made of white concrete prefabricated panels, hand chiseled by Mexican workers (made in Tenochtitlan and brought to Austin). This is a finish that I invented, which stands the test of time, and has a texture that reveals the human imprint of its craftsmanship.

I wish long life to the MACC and also hope for its completion.

Amigas y amigos:

Reciban desde Tenochtitlán un saludo de Teodoro González de León; un saludo y una felicitación los cinco años de vida del Mexican American Cultural Center.

Hace doce años, en el año 2000, con la buena compañía del amigo –ya desaparecido– Gabriel Martín del Campo y del querido Jaime Beaman, con mi torpe inglés, explicamos nuestras intenciones arquitectónicas a los representantes de la Comunidad Mexicana. Las estrellas se juntaron y nos escogieron para desarrollar el proyecto y, en diciembre del mismo año, presentamos el diseño conceptual a la consideración de toda la Comunidad: un edificio en forma de media luna  -que contenía el museo y aulas-  y abrazaba una plaza  -un zócalo-  para eventos, con vista al lago, y tres prismas triangulares que contenían un salón de usos múltiples y dos teatros. El proyecto gustó y fue aceptado, pero tuvieron que pasar siete años para obtener los recursos y construir la primera etapa: un edificio blanco, con una plaza viendo al lago, con la mitad de la media luna y el volumen triangular del salón multiusos. Todos sus muros exteriores y parteluces son paneles prefabricados de concreto blanco, cincelados a mano, por obreros mexicanos (fabricados en Tenochtitlán y traídos a Austin). Es un acabado inventado por mí, que resiste el paso del tiempo y una textura que revela la mano humana de su manufactura.

Deseo larga vida al MACC y hago votos por la segunda etapa.

About the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center

If you have not yet visited the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center, you are in for a treat.  Our magnificent facility was designed by world known architect Teodoro Gonzales de León and is a visually spectacular addition to our Parks and Recreation Department’s cultural facilities.

MACC at night

Keep up-to-date on our events through the City’s events calendar and the ESB-MACC's own website: www.MACCAustin.org. 

Please don’t hesitate to stop by and enjoy our art, theater, classes and family fun.

 

Tagged:
Austin Arts and Parks
Oct 16, 2012 - 03:10 pm CDT

During an official City Hall ceremony, Representatives with Austin Parks & Recreation Department Presented their 2012 Awards to our much appreciated Partners in the Arts and Humanities Recipients.

Photo showing award

Parks & Recreation Department Director, Sara L. Hensley, CPRP, Laura Esparza, Division Manager of the History, Art and Nature Division and Russell Wiseman, Culture and Arts Education Manager for the Dougherty Arts Center

Parks & Recreation Department Director, Sara L. Hensley, CPRP, Laura Esparza, Division Manager of the History, Art and Nature Division and Russell Wiseman, Culture and Arts Education Manager for the Dougherty Arts Center.

October 11, 2012, Austin, Texas,

Mayor, Lee Leffingwell, Austin Parks & Recreation Department Director, Sara L. Hensley, CPRP, Laura Esparza, Division Manager of the History, Art and Nature Division and Russell Wiseman, Culture and Arts Education Manager for the Dougherty Arts Center participated in celebrating October which is National Arts and Humanities Month.  This is a coast-to-coast collective celebration of culture, arts and humanities in America.  It has become the largest annual celebration of the arts and humanities in the nation.  The History, Art and Nature Division of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department took this opportunity to recognize several individuals, businesses and organizations for their outstanding contribution to the arts in Austin during this past year. 

This year’s nominations were groups and individuals who went above and beyond in helping our museums, cultural centers and natural treasures reach their full potential.

On behalf of The Elisabet Ney Museum

Officials with Lynn Hill

The Elisabet Ney Museum would like to honor S. Lynn Hill.  Lynn has been a consistent weekly volunteer at the Elisabet Ney Museum since January of this year.  While, it has only been six months, S. Lynn Hill, a Master Naturalist and Urban Habitat Steward, has brought knowledge and passion for the environment to the Ney Museum.  This has created very positive results for the prairie restoration project.  She shares not only her time and expertise, but she also shares her knowledge and love for native plants and seeds.  Lynn also acted as an expert during the Ney Museum’s Urban Birds event.  Lynn is a great asset to the museum and to the greater Austin community.  Thank you, Lynn for you commitment to the Ney Museum and the citizens of Austin.

On behalf of The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center

officials with Dr Aolle Johnson

The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center would like to recognize Dr. Allen Johnson.  This is a man with a mission, a proud mission.  For the past five years Dr. Johnson has been developing the Carver Centers’ Genealogy Workshop Series.  He has brought it to the attention of local citizens interested in connecting with their past and he has brought the Carver Center to national visibility by guiding those who are interested in learning and saving their own past.  Dr. Johnson is the Carver’s resident genealogist, conducting the monthly workshop meetings with various related topics on genealogy.   This job takes a lot of time and a lot of patience.  He gives that and more.  His quiet intelligent manner always wins the day because he knows that tomorrow will bring new challenges to the great reward of learning what one’s heritage is.  He knows there is nothing like knowing, appreciating and sharing your own family history. Thank you Dr. Johnson for helping us to have a better understanding of ourselves.

officials with William Brown

The George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center would also like to recognize William Brown.  William is a junior at Westlake High School.  He came to the George Washington Carver Museum because he had heard about the Carver’s Broadway Bound Performing Arts Camp.  William was too old to register for the camp, so he offered to voluntarily design the lights.  William spends at least 20 hours a week for six weeks at the museum designing, hanging, circuiting, gelling and running the lights for the show.  He is a bright young man who offered his talent and time freely. Thank you William, for your generous spirit and hard work.  We really appreciate you!

On behalf of The Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater

John Faulk, Mac Ragsdale, David Malish

The History, Art and Nature Division of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department would also like to recognize John Faulk, Mac Ragsdale and David Malish.  These three gentlemen made generous donations of time and other resources in the renovation of the backstage area of the Zilker Hillside Theater.  Thanks to these gentlemen and the businesses they represent, the Zilker Hillside Theater’s backstage area has been increased by roughly twice the space that it used to be.  The foundations for a green room, offices and rehearsal rooms backstage have been laid and extensive storage under the stage has been created.  This improvement will serve not only the Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater’s co-sponsored groups: Zilker Theater Productions and the Austin Shakespeare Festival, but also all of the Theater’s many renters.  Thank you very much.   

Flintco LCC.

The History, Art and Nature Division of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department would like to recognize Flintco LLC represented by John A. Martin, Mike Hutter, Peter Narvarte and Mark Pearce.  Flintco was instrumental in the development of the backstage renovation of the Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater in Zilker Park.  Their good work will ensure high quality programming on a grander scale for many years to come.  The citizens of Austin will find a bigger and better environment both onstage, backstage and in the audience as a result of Flintco’s generosity.  This will allow the Hillside Theater’s Co-sponsors and renters to attempt more challenging productions which will result in a better quality and more engaging experience for all of Austin’s citizens when they attend the Beverly S. Sheffield Zilker Hillside Theater.  Thank you to one and all. This was a marvelous example of a public private partnership that will benefit Austin for literally years to come.  We would like to extend our sincere thanks to everyone involved for your vision, your expertise and your commitment to Austin.  Thank you.

On behalf of The O. Henry Museum

Clay Smith from Texas Book Festival

The O. Henry Museum is recognizing the Texas Book Festival, Lidia Agraz, Executive Director.  The Texas Book Festival was represented by Clay Smith.  The Texas Book Festival has been an important collaborator with the O. Henry Museum for the past two years. The Book Festival has provided authors to participate in museum programming; promoted museum offerings like the Short Story Master Class and Coolest Book Club in the World, and co-sponsored museum events such as the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories anthology publication celebration. The Texas Book Festival has helped elevate the image of the O. Henry Museum and in turn, enhanced the literary arts community in Austin.  Thanks to the Texas Book Festival for promoting literacy and the O.Henry Museum.

On behalf of The Zilker Botanical Garden

Austin Area Garden Council winners

The Zilker Botanical Garden would like to honor the Austin Area Garden Council for their significant contributions to the improvement of the botanical garden.  Joining us were Garden Center President Donna Freidenreich, Ed Parker, project coordinator for the Taniguchi Japanese Garden, Christie Rogers, project coordinator for the Woodland Fern bed and Mark Berthiaume.  In particular, “AAGC” contributed significant infrastructure improvements to the pond system in and around the Taniguchi Japanese Garden.  This saves water and enhances the appearance of the tranquil Japanese-inspired garden.  Additionally, one of the AAGC member garden clubs, The Garden Club of Austin, contributed a new Woodland Fern Bed, first, by clearing invasive species, then by installing a stream bed, irrigation and a variety of ferns for this new public exhibit.  The Parks and Recreation Department extends our most sincere appreciation for the Austin Area Garden Center’s creativity, work, and contribution to improve the experience for citizens and visitors to the Zilker Botanical Garden.

Group photo of recipients for the 2012 Partners in the Arts and Humanities Award

Group photo

For information on any of our Museum, Cultural Centers and Nature & Science Centers, please see our blog.

Tagged:
Austin Arts and Parks
Oct 04, 2012 - 11:38 am CDT

ESB-MACC Presents an Exhibit by José Antonio Garcíaguerra

The current show at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center is an outstanding example of one artist’s quest to create meaningful works of art, both beautiful and historic. This is a great way to communicate one’s pride in country and appreciation of nature.

photo of exhibit

Now on exhibit through November 24th, 2012. Don’t miss it!

opening wall at exhibit

 

eagels

Description of José Antonio Garcíaguerra’s work: (Translation by Paloma Mayorga)

The work presented by the artist is made up of graphite drawings and bronze sculptures, which were created using the method of “lost wax”. This method represents elements involved in the Independence of Mexico, such as the Bell of Dolores with which the Mexican people were called to arms. The drawings are of heroes of the same fight for independence, like Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, José María Morelos y Pavón, La Corregidora Doña Josefa Ortíz de Domínguez, and Ignacio Allende; as well as the Cathedral of Saltillo and the Landín Chapel, which are symbols of the religious devotion of the Mexican people during that time. The work also consists of emblems like carts and carriages, characters like “El Escribano” (the letter writer), and the weapons that were utilized during the Independence of Mexico.

photo of exhibit

 

photo of sculpture of Mexican indepedence bells

 

photo of sculpture

 

photo of sculpture

 

photo of sculpture

 

photo of graphic

 

photo of graphic

José Antonio Garcíaguerra’s Biography

Herlinda Zamora the artist and Gloria Pennigton

Photo of Herlinda Zamora, The ESB-MACC's manger, the artist, José Antonio Garcíaguerra holding the poster he designed for this year's Diez y Seis Celebration and Gloria Pennington

From Saltillo, Mexico, José Antonio Garcíaguerra was passionate about drawing, painting, and sculpting from the beginning. Autodidactic and mature in his style, he has mastered the technique of bronze sculpting, and he manages to extract significant detail from reality in order to achieve the beauty in his sculptures. He defines his work as realism, and utilizes the “lost wax technique” to depict the fauna and horses of northern Mexico that he is so passionate about. These, as well as the nude female figures he also sculpts, exemplify his characteristic style

The realism in the work of J.A. Garcíaguerra is based on a large body of documentation, appreciation, and elaboration of sketches, photos, and close observation of movements and habits. He has participated in important exhibitions in both Mexico and abroad, and has received positive reviews such as from Rocio Castelo Perrín, a graduate of law and visual arts and a critic in art history, and who is the principle director of art workshops for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Monterrey, Mexico. Castelo Perrín has described the work of Garcíaguerra below:

“The understanding and sensibility toward all living forms of nature combined with a precocious ability for drawing has allowed José Antonio Garcíaguerra from a very young age to give expression to the world that moves him.

The Wax in his hands became the moldable tool with which he, like any sculptor, translates emotions into forms. The artist presents vivid contrasts between the vigorous dramatism of the animal world and a gentle vision of the feminine nude. José Antonio elegantly achieves sculpting the feminine nude to show their forms with simplicity and purity; it is a sensuality that translates a natural lack of pretension.

In his works with animals, the intelligent and lively look of the eagle shows daring and strength. The horses’ muscles become speed that the bronze holds and gives back to the spectators’ eyes in its sculpted lines which intertwine with rhythm and harmony. His pieces, all made with the ancient ‘lost wax’ technique, transmit, to those who are observant, the nobility, as shown in their eyes, of the dogs in their continuous wait, the delicate plasticity of the deer, or the untamed courage and strength of the bulls.

The bronzes of José Antonio Garcíaguerra are in that frontier territory in which nature end and reality becomes art… it is human creation.”

About the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center

If you have not yet visited the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center, you are in for a treat.  Our magnificent facility was designed by world known architect Theodoro Gonzales de Leon and is a visually spectacular addition to our Parks and Recreation Department’s cultural facilities.

MACC at night

Keep up-to-date on our events through the City’s events calendar and the ESB-MACC's own website: www.MACCAustin.org. 

Please don’t hesitate to stop by and enjoy our art, theater, classes and family fun.

Tagged:
Austin Arts and Parks
Sep 19, 2012 - 11:21 am CDT

Once again, the dedicated staff at the ESB-MACC together with the City of Austin put on another great event.

Approximately 2,500 to 3,000 Austin citizens and visitors came to this year’s free celebration. First there was an exhibition by the Association de Charros El Herradero y Escaramuza El Rosario (the original Texan Cowboys).  Our fiesta’s musical entertainment started with Mariachi Tamazula , plus singer Ernesto Cadena Segovia (also Saltillo). The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen is an ESB-MACC repeat favorite. Their costumes and skills remind us how diverse Texas culture is. Many musical and dance influences show up in their captivating performances.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012

From southern Spain with its Moorish influence to the German immigrants of the 19th century, Tejano culture is a rich mixture of many traditions. 

The evening closed with Mariachi Nueva Generacion from Texas State University.  Adding to the festivities, were participating food booths that were set up to provide delicious Mexican dishes and cold drinks.

This is one the ESB-MACC’s major mission – providing Tejanos, Mexican Americans and resident Mexicans a place of their own and a symbol of ethnic pride.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 view from balcony

Every evening on September the 15th for the last five years, the ESB-MACC, The City of Austin, the Consul General of Mexico, and the Fiesta de Independencia Foundation proudly present our citizens an official Dies y Seis Celebration.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 welcome table

Our welcome table with all the ESB-MACC programming, classes and events.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012

We take great pride in emulating the actual celebrations taking place all over Mexico on this evening. Like government officials all over Mexico, Austin’s own Consul General of Mexico, Rosella Ojeda, graciously provides the traditional “El Grito” or “call for independence.

Delivered from the traditional “El Balcon de la Independencies”, just like Hidalgo (the father of Mexican independence) decried freedom and “Viva Mexico” in 1810. We decorate our balcony, overlooking our own Zacalo (Mexican plaza) with a large bell to complete the authentic experience.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012

Our great food court

 

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Gloria and Herlinda

The City of Austin’s Gloria Mata Pennington, and ESB-MACC Herlind Zamora.

We at the ESB-MACC want to thank the City of Austin’s Gloria Mata Pennington for her decades of dedication and expertise in helping make our city a more inclusive and enjoyable place to live. Gloria’s in depth knowledge of protocol has helped us all in piecing together the city’s important & meaningful events. Equal gratitude was shown to Gus Garcia, our former mayor and tireless advocate for all of Austin’s residents.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 shot of building

ESB-MACC is the perfect place for community get together.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012, VIP room

ESB-MACC VIP room for community guests and visitors from Mexico.

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, stage

The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen performing Tejano Dances.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

The Folklorico Dance Troop from South Texas College in McAllen performing Traditional Mexican dances.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Folkloric dancers

 

Folkloric dancers

 

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, stage

 

mariachi band

 

folklorica dancers

 

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 US and Texan Flag

The US and Texan Flags were presented by Tejanos in Action Color Guard.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Mexican flag passed

The Mexican flag was then presented to the Consul General by Tejanos in Action Color Guard.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Mexican National anthem sung

Ernesto Cadena Segovia, a well-respected singer, also from Saltillo, helped complete our authentic celebration with singing the Mexican National Anthem after the ringing of the our representational “campana”( independence bell). Gloria said “People tell me they have never heard the Mexican National Anthem sung any better than Ernesto did.” Ernesto, his father, sister, niece and grandniece all made the celebration even more authentic.

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Gloria and Ernesto

Gloris and our Guest from Saltillo, Ernesto Cadena Segovia who sang the Mexican National Anthem.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Gloria and Mexican Consul General Rosalba Ojeda

Gloria and Austin's Mexican Consul General Rosalba Ojeda.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 visiting sculptor Jose Antonio Garciaguerra

Adding to the evening’s celebrations were honored guests from Austin’s sister city, Saltillo, in Coahuila, Mexico. José Antonio Garciaguerra was in attendance. He is the noted Mexican sculptor whose exhibit currently graces our main gallery (and a permanent example of his work adorns the entry to our main auditorium.)

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Ernesto and guests

Ernesto Cadena Segovia and his; wife, father, sister, her daughter and grand daughter.

ESB-MACC 16 de sept celebrations - 2012 Former mayor Gus Garcia

Gus Garcia, our former mayor his wife and friends.

MACC 2012, 16 de septiembre celebration, Lloyd Dogget

 US Representative Lloyd Dogget dropped by our celebration to urge everyone to come out on election day and vote.

MACC courtyard with projection on wall

For added convenience, free shuttles ran every fifteen minutes making the evening even more enjoyable. Visitors could leave behind the headache of finding parking, and ride the shuttle.

About the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center

If you have not yet visited the Emma S. Barrientos - Mexican American Cultural Center, you are in for a treat.  Our magnificent facility was designed by world known architect Theodoro Gonzales de Leon and is a visually spectacular addition to our Parks and Recreation Department’s cultural facilities.

MACC at night

Keep up-to-date on our events through the City’s events calendar and the ESB-MACC's own website: www.MACCAustin.org. 

Please don’t hesitate to stop by and enjoy our art, theater, classes and family fun.

Austin Arts and Parks
Sep 14, 2012 - 11:48 am CDT

New Exhibit at theGeorge Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center, September 6 - January 5, 2013

Sculptural woodcarving is the preeminent traditional art form among the Yoruba. Yoruba woodcarvers are widely acknowledged for their superior craftsmanship. Known as “agbegi lere”  (carver of wood-figures), Yoruba woodcarvers are held in high esteem within their society.

african art, wood carving, exhibit

ÈRE is a Yoruba term that means “sculpture” or “statuary”. More precisely, as used in the title of this exhibition, ÈRE encapsulates the art genre of the Yoruba Master Carvers and summarizes the plurality of Yoruba statuary as secular, utilitarian, architectural, and spiritual. The transcendental import of its duality as sacred object and spirit signify the physical manifestation of a Yoruba worldview.

african art, wood carving, exhibit photo

Traditional Art

ÉRE, the core of this two-part exhibition entails outstanding sculptures by three globally renowned Yoruba master carvers: Olowe of Ise (1875-1938), Dada Areogun of Osi-IIorin (1880-1954), and Bamgboye ofOdo-Owa (1893-1978). These artists were mostly commissioned by Yoruba royalty, religious organizations, and wealthy patrons to produce household and religious objects, such as doors, veranda posts, and ceremonial carvings. Their aesthetic expressions are predicated on the traditional Yoruba concept of beautification known as oju-ona. Oju-ona signifies adornment of surfaces with traditional Yoruba motifs, patterns, and symbols.

Emphasis on elaborate surface embellishment and elegant geometric forms are distinguishing characteristics of Yoruba carving. The masterworks shown in ÉRE are analogous to poetry in their dynamic composition, rhythm, and harmony.

Featured Master Carvers of Traditional Yoruba Art now on exhibit are: Olowe of Ise, Dada Areogun, and Bamgboye of Odo-Owa.

 

african art, wood carving, artist lecture

Contemporary Yoruba Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D discusses his work with Bernadette Phifer, Manager of the Carver.

african art

Contemporary Art

REFLECTIONS, features the art of Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D., whose artwork is mostly influenced by his experience and knowledge of traditional Yoruba art, including an early apprenticeship in Yoruba woodcarving. The highly textured surface and profuse use of traditional Yoruba patterns and symbols in his oeuvre, especially in his low-relief sculpture, is reminiscent of the stylistic approach of the Yoruba masterworks of Olowe, Areogun, and Bamgboye.

african art, wood carving

Contemporary Yoruba woodcarving by Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D

african art, wood carving

 

african art, wood carving

Traditional Yoruba Art now on exhibit with pieces by: Olowe of Ise, Dada Areogun, and Bamgboye of Odo-Owa.

african art, wood carving

Contemporary Yoruba woodcarving by Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D

african art, artist lecture

Photos from our Artist's Talk, held on Sept. 13th, 2012.  Contemporary Yoruba Artist Christopher Olubunmi Adejumo, Ph.D. discussed his work,shown above.  The artist dedicates this exhibit to the participants in the Greater Tomorrow Youth Art Program.

Austin Arts and Parks