Mar 04, 2020 - 10:42 am CST

Photo of Adrian Gonzalez with trees in the background.

We’re pleased to introduce you to Adrian Gonzalez, our office's new Communications Intern. We asked him a few get-to-know-you questions so you can learn more about him and his background.

Q: Where are you from?

A: I’m from McAllen, TX, a city in the Rio Grande Valley. It’s about a five-hour drive south of Austin, but the authentic Mexican food, swaying palm trees, and loving people make the dreadful drive totally worth it.

Q: What is your educational background?

A: I am currently in my final semester at St. Edward’s University. In May, I will be graduating with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism & Digital Media and a minor in Communication.

Q: Where did you work before joining our office?

A: Through my four years at St. Edward’s, I’ve been involved in several extracurricular activities that have contributed to my overall learning experience. I am working with the school's Recreation & Wellness department, currently write for Hilltop Views, and participated in a service immersion trip in Los Angeles, Cali. last spring.

Hilltop Views, the student-run newspaper of SEU, is where I’ve been able to work as a graphic designer, staff writer, and Sports Editor. As a section editor, I work directly with staff writers to ensure that they produce quality articles by editing their stories and helping them develop as better journalists. Though I enjoy writing about sports, I’m mainly drawn to storytelling and sharing the interesting experiences that other people have gone through.

Whether it be through written articles, photo essays or video projects, I have been able to contribute to the school’s newspaper while also strengthening my digital media skills.

Q: What will you be working on for the Office of Sustainability?

A: I'm so excited to work alongside such knowledgeable and determined individuals as the office’s Communication Intern. During my internship, I will use my digital media and communication background to inform Austinites about the city’s Community Climate Plan, reducing carbon emissions, and living sustainably. Being a part of a team that works tirelessly to combat climate issues is what I find most rewarding.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do in Austin?

A: My favorite thing about Austin is the abundance of natural spaces. I also enjoy the coffee shops, local restaurants, and unique stores located on South Congress.

Q: What is your favorite sustainable thing you do in your personal life?

A: My favorite way to practice a sustainable lifestyle would be minimizing single-use items and relying on reusable methods instead. Being conscious of sustainability, such as switching from plastic water bottles to reusable bottles or replacing single-use K-cups with a reusable K-cup, has made such a difference in the way I live. I’m always open to learning different ways on how to reduce my footprint as well as how to compost and reduce waste.

Q: Are you a dog person or cat person?

A: Perhaps the single-most challenging question humanity has ever faced. Personally, this is a tough one. Growing up, my family had a few dogs that I grew fond of. But, more recently, I’ve had a few cats appear at my family’s house and stick around for the cuddling and food (mostly, just for the food).

But if I had to choose, I’d have to go with dogs. Their loyalty, playfulness, and endless love doesn’t compare. In fact, I plan on adopting a dog after I graduate!

Jan 29, 2020 - 11:34 am CST

Leading with Equity in Austin's Climate Plan Update

As we embark on revising Austin’s Community Climate Plan, a lot has changed since we created our first plan in 2015. We now know that climate change is happening faster than we thought, and that the landscape of potential solutions has changed in terms of cost and technology. We also know that climate solutions have the potential to improve everyone’s quality of life, but climate change impacts don’t affect everyone equally. This is why we are leading with racial equity and learning from the lived experience of people in our community as we explore solutions to the climate crisis.

As part of our planning process, we convened six advisory groups that will focus on specific topics related to energy, transportation, food, and access to nature. We also launched a Climate Ambassadors Program that will give us the opportunity to hear from people in our community who have been historically left out of the conversation.

All-in-all, this effort includes over 130 people who will meet over the course of six months. In order to give everyone a foundation and common understanding of racial equity and environmental justice issues, we asked that everyone participate in an equity-focused workshop.

Two people talking to eachother in a conference room.  A group of people sitting in a circle in a conference room. They are facing a facilitator and powerpoint screen.

Several people sitting in small groups and talking in a conference room. 

Laying the foundation for racial equity

 

In creating the workshop, our goal was to have authentic and meaningful conversations around race, class, and equity in the context of Austin’s history. We chose Dr. Tane Ward to lead the discussion, because he has over 15 years of experience in facilitation with a focus on social issues and expertise in racial and climate justice. 

Through the course of the workshop, Dr. Ward helped create the space to discuss the history and legacy of colonialism. The conversations were meant to challenge and address long-held perspectives, and create an understanding of how economic and racial segregation impact health, education, and wealth outcomes. As part of the workshop, Dr. Ward offered the following Justice Litmus test:

  1. Is there a sense of urgency in our work?
  2. Are we using either/or thinking or decision-making?
  3. Is our work displaying signs of paternalism?
  4. Is there fear of open conflict in our work?
  5. Is the right to comfort being prioritized in our work?
  6. Are we applying tunnel vision to our work?
  7. Are we avoiding “reinventing the wheel” in our work?
  8. Does growth or money reflect our values?
  9. Are leaders being nurtured and developed horizontally?
  10. Is open critique of our work met with “aggressive appreciation” to minimize the critique or avoid discomfort?

These principles are meant to act as a screening process to help us shift our thinking and behavior in ways that are meant to defeat white supremacist culture. We will be using the Justice Litmus test as a tool to help keep us accountable as we build a plan that is actionable and will result in real change as we strive for climate justice in our community and beyond.

Reflections and takeaways

 

After the workshop, we asked a couple of participants to reflect on what they took away from the exercise, and how it will impact their work in the future. Here’s what they had to say:

"The workshop prompted us to engage in meaningful discussions about how urban plans reproduce racial injustice. We walked through a series of exercises to envision how the Climate Action Plan can advance equitable solutions. This created a critical foundation for how the group will plan a more green and just Austin." – Miriam Solis, Assistant Professor at the UT School of Architecture

“My experience at the workshop was extremely insightful and full of inspirational nuggets. I plan to apply what I learned in a couple ways. The first is through my day to day job as a Landscape Architect Designer. I plan to emphasize the need for a more equitable lens through more community engagement, using sustainable materiality, and taking into account the socioeconomic impact of the projects I am a part of. The second way is to educate myself more on the history of Austin and other equity issues so I can apply it to my work. Overall, the workshop has broadened my perspective of the relationships between people and place, and ultimately in realizing how the racial divide is still very apparent.” – Francisco J Rosales, Landscape Architect Designer, TBG Partners

 

If you’d like to get involved in the Climate Plan Process, please consider attending one of our five community workshops around Transportation, access to nature, consumerism, and sustainable buildings. You can see the full schedule here under “Get Involved”.

Jan 23, 2020 - 02:01 pm CST

By: Taja Beekley, Sales & Event Manager at the Austin Central Library and proud dog owner of Willoughby.

When we adopt a pet, we commit ourselves to a life of love and care. There are ways that we can incorporate a more earth-friendly approach to their wellbeing. Although it may seem more expensive or time consuming, these endeavors can often lead to a happier and healthier pet, as well as cost savings for their owner.

Reduce Your Carbon Footprint:

  • Pedal your pet to the vet. Select a veterinarian that is close to your home. Have a bike trailer for your kids? Try using it for your four-legged friend. If the clinic is within walking distance and no trailer is required, even better. Willoughby is better behaved at the vet after taking in fresh air on his way to the appointment.
  • Literally “run errands” with your pet. If you are fortunate to reside in an area that is both dog and pedestrian friendly, walk or run your dog to the pet store or other retailer, coffee shop, bank, chiropractor, etc. Often, these places provide free dog treats and water bowls.

Engage in Sustainable Living:

  • Environmental poop bags. Purchase biodegradable/compostable poop bags. Just be aware of false marketing claims and make sure you purchase from reputable brand.
  • Homemade Meals and Treats. Reusable containers are very handy if you have time to prepare food. Willoughby eats a combination of chicken, beef, and salmon. Include older/bruised fruits and vegetables to your dog’s diet you can always freeze them for later. For those dogs with sensitive stomachs like Willoughby, switching to a homemade diet has saved time and money at the vet.
  • Bones. Buy bones from ranchers at the neighborhood Farmers Market and take your dog to pick them up.
  • Upcycled toys. If you are crafty, old tennis balls and clothes (especially jeans) can be re-purposed for toys. Willoughby especially likes to play with paper boxes.
  • Teeth brushing. Use a bamboo toothbrush and organic coconut oil for oral hygiene. Tooth brushing is now part of Willoughby’s daily routine he loves the flavor and attention.
  • Compost pet hair and nail clippings. If you are not currently in Austin Resource Recovery’s Curbside Composting Collection Program, try establishing your own compost system at home you may even be eligible for a rebate.

Go on Green Adventures:

  • Keep Austin Beautiful. Many local nonprofit organizations offer volunteer-based events. Sign up and take your dog. Willoughby loves meeting new friends.
  • Scoop the Poop. Always pick up after your own dog’s waste and other less responsible dog owners especially around our parks, trails, and waterways.

Jan 23, 2020 - 10:48 am CST

Photo of Raasin McIntosh posing near a couple of brightly-painted pillars. Graphic next to her reads "Raasin McIntosh Net-Zero Hero"

I’m helping to make Austin Net-Zero by: beautifying communities

Headshot of Raasin McIntosh wearing a black hat that says "Texas 1989"

Meet Raasin McIntosh, Olympic and collegiate athlete and Founder of the non-profit organization Raasin in the Sun. Raasin was first inspired to create community beautification projects when she travelled to West Africa in 2012 to compete in front of thousands of fans. There, she became inspired by the local children who were “full of light and energy”. It was then that she decided that she wanted to spend her time inspiring others to shine their light.

Rooted in East Austin, Raasin in the Sun works to beautify urban communities through projects that unite residents. We met up with Raasin at a recently completed mural project on Rosewood Avenue underneath Pleasant Valley Road. Read on to discover what drives her, what her toughest challenges have been, and what advice she has for others.

What inspired you to take action?

Understanding that we have the ability to take action, improve the environment, and inspire others to do the same. To shine light so that others can be truly inspired to shine their own light and rise above adversity.

Community clean-up.  Raasin in work gloves helping with a community clean-up.

How did you do it?

I created Raasin in the Sun to have a platform for creating various types of beautification projects ranging from building community gardens, organizing community clean ups, painting murals, and restoring residential and vacant lots. I’m so inspired when I’m working collaboratively to transform unused places to areas of community pride where people can gather, grow healthy food, and enjoy greener and unique spaces. Bringing together volunteers to do the shared work of beautification means creating strong bonds through tackling problems together creatively.

One of the really memorable projects for me was when we helped restore the home of prominent East Austinites Wilhelmina and Exalton Delco. Wilhelmina is the first African American elected to public office in Austin, and served 10 terms in the Texas Legislature. Another project we completed with our community partners last year involved transforming pillars along Rosewood Avenue underneath Pleasant Valley Road into works of art. For this project, we got to work with six local artists to beautify the pillars. We’ve also worked on garden projects for Ortega Elementary and Cultivo Café in East Austin.

Elderly couple sitting outside their home.  Group photo underneath an overpass.

What's been the toughest part?

The toughest part has been developing and growing our vacant lot initiatives. Vacant lot projects can be a long and challenging process. There are often time constraints since most of the lots are in urban areas with plans for future development. In addition, a crucial component is corporation funding and cooperation from the City to truly help these types of projects come to life so that the community can benefit while the lots are still vacant.

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

Mural beautification has proven to be one of the most impactful types of projects we do, since it allows us to create opportunities for artists to do what they do best. The greatest reward is seeing the efforts and mission of the organization truly play out in the most beautifully creative ways.

Brightly colored collage of Raasin and other artists painting murals on pillars underneath an overpass.

What advice do you have for others?

Let your passion drive your creativity in making the world a better place.

Photo of Raasin smiling next to a quote that reads "Let your passion drive your creativity in making the world a better place."

To learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

Nov 19, 2019 - 12:57 pm CST

Giving thanks sustainably

As Thanksgiving approaches, menu planning, trips to reconnect with family and friends, and Black Friday shopping lists can be front-of-mind. We propose shifting your perspective to slow down and simplify this year. Since this is a holiday based on gratitude, why not start from a place of feeling abundant and plentiful? When we recognize everything we already have, it’s easier to think about ways to reduce our impact on the planet.

Here are five tips to have a more sustainable Thanksgiving that begins with a mindset focused on the plenty all around us:

 

Explore your local farmer’s market

There are so many beautiful fruits and vegetables grown locally! Buying local food means fewer food miles, which in turn means lower greenhouse gas emissions. Conventionally grown food travels roughly 1,500 miles from farm to plate, compared to just 50 miles for local products. And smaller local farms typically use more sustainable farming methods like using compost as a natural fertilizer.

Ditch the disposables

With so many different dishes being served and with so many people at the table, Thanksgiving dinner can turn into a big pile of dishes. So, it’s not uncommon for regular plates, cups, napkins, and silverware to be swapped with disposables. But this is a special occasion that deserves the fine china or grandma’s heirlooms! Sure, it’ll mean a little extra time at the sink, but it’s also a time to reflect on the memories of other special dinners and events where you’ve used the extra-special plates and silver.

Grow what you throw

Every Thanksgiving, Americans throw away over 200 million pounds uneaten turkey. That’s a lot of food being wasted. Compost your table scraps this year and turn what would be wasted into fertilizer for future food instead.

Create a holiday gift list that’s not about stuff

Instead of waiting in long lines on Black Friday or placing orders on Cyber Monday that involves lots of packaging and delivery miles traveled, consider creating a holiday gift list focused on services, experiences, or time. Treating those you love to a spa service, a dinner out, tickets to a concert, or a gift certificate to babysit may be more meaningful than stuff. Your friends and family will be touched, and the earth will be thankful as well!

Avoid the food coma and get outside

Many families like to celebrate Thanksgiving Day by watching a movie or a sports game on TV together. Try mixing it up this year and get outside for a while. Take a walk with your loved ones to a nearby park, enjoy some pre-dinner snacks on the front porch, or play frisbee or football in the crisp autumn air. Getting outside and embracing nature is a great way to give thanks to the earth!

 

Deep breaths everybody – Thanksgiving can be a time to slow down and truly give thanks. And embracing just a few of the above changes amounts to a much bigger impact for the planet!

Nov 15, 2019 - 03:50 pm CST

Photo of woman with short brown hair in front of a doorway to a home. Text reads "Taylor Youngblood Net-Zero Hero"

I’m helping to make Austin Net-Zero by: encouraging neighbors to actively take part in zero waste.

 

Meet Taylor Youngblood, a recycle and reuse advocate and Zero Waste Block Leader. Taylor regularly provides advice to her neighbors in the Mueller neighborhood about recycling, composting, and reuse. She tables at events, runs a blog, and has started several collection programs for hard-to-recycle items in her neighborhood. Taylor’s passion is to make zero waste concepts accessible to everyone and she makes it her mission to answer even the most detailed questions from community members.

We spoke with Taylor about what motivates her, what her toughest challenges have been, and what inspires her share her zero waste knowledge. Read more below.

 

What inspired you to take action?

It all started when I was walking my dogs and observing recycling and trash carts in my neighborhood one day. When I looked closely, I noticed that there was so much contamination in the recycling carts. Just as sad were all the discarded items that could have had a second life if they had been reused or donated.

When the opportunity to attend Zero Waste Block Leader training came up, I jumped at the opportunity to learn all I could about recycling in Austin.  It seemed like the more I learned, the more questions I started getting from neighbors and friends. That’s when I decided to really amp things up.

Net-Zero can feel like this big, abstract concept. The long road from here to there can seem intimidating, overwhelming, and even impossible to tackle all at once. My goal is to make that road feel accessible and navigable. Being a Zero Waste Block Leader lets me share my passion.

A bright red poster with detailed recycling instructions for the Mueller Recycling Group.  Taylor and her husband composting

Taylor tabling at an outreach event.

 

How did you do it?

I work to stay up-to-date on what Net-Zero actually means across the different domains: compost, recycling, re-use, etc. I try to break down those details and rules into practical daily habits and share them on my blog alittlemore.green, social media, at neighborhood events, and really wherever anyone wants to talk to me about zero waste. What I’m shooting for is habits that are easy to understand, adopt, and even enjoy.

I began by posting photos, comments, and Austin Resource Recovery links on our neighborhood Facebook Group and NextDoor. A neighbor recommended I use my Zero Waste Block Leader title, so I started including it on posts and wearing my Block Leader shirt at Mueller events. I love walkup questions!

After curbside composting came to our neighborhood, I was asked to write an article introducing and explaining the program for the neighborhood newsletter. Then the questions really started coming in! I began tabling at all the neighborhood events and attending and presenting at the neighborhood association meetings. I started a blog to share longer posts and more in-depth information.

I also started collecting Styrofoam and random large items for the Austin Recycle & Reuse Drop-off Center at my home. Soon, I was receiving requests for more collection times and a wider variety of materials. Neighbors started asking how they could help with these collections so I started the Mueller Recycling Group where you can sign up to collect items from neighbors that need to be taken to the Drop-off Center or mailed in to a program like TerraCycle. That evolved further once I learned about other opportunities to recycle like Wands for Wildlife and contact lens recycling. That led me to start working with Mueller’s local businesses to recycle their products as well. I hope to find more opportunities in the future.

Taylor holding up a recyclable plastic package.  Taylor and her son composting

Whats's been the toughest part?

Figuring out how to educate and engage people. Despite reaching out in person and on more than four digital platforms, it’s still difficult to connect with everyone. I can’t seem to find the missing link. It’s also frustrating and sad when people genuinely don't know they're contaminating their recycling or compost. And, trying to educate people on what they don’t know they don’t know is a real uphill battle.

 

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

Meeting more neighbors than I ever would have otherwise. Being a Zero Waste Block Leader has led to several leadership positions in the neighborhood and helped me make so many friends. That has been amazing! Engagement really brings neighbors together and builds community a place where neighbors stop and greet each other by name.

The greatest reward is the increased interest. I’m starting to see more in-depth and difficult questions. I’m seeing people participate across multiple discussions and helping to advise each other directly. And, of course, I’m always thrilled when neighbors tell me they share my posts with friends and family! That’s so inspiring.

Taylor about to compost a coffee filter.  Taylor recycling laundry bottle and yogurt container in her home.

What advice do you have for others?

Look, listen and be available. Look with beginner’s eyes for areas where you can help. Where can you speak up on a topic or issue that you have passion or knowledge about?

Listen to your community. I think I’ve been successful at affecting change because I listen to neighbors’ concerns and questions, I follow up with them, and I get them an answer. I make myself available and I show I’m a real person experiencing the same things they are.

Communication is key. Providing more information is always better than less. I want to know everything I can about everything recycling and compost, and others out there do too.

Reach people who are new to Austin. People are moving here every day, and we need to educate them about how to reuse and properly recycle items in Austin. We need to get everyone on board if we’re going to achieve Net-Zero.

Taylor with her son outside of her home next to a sign that reads "Zero Waste Block Leader austinrecycles.com"

 

To learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

 

Nov 14, 2019 - 02:31 pm CST

We’re pleased to introduce you to Celine Rendon, a Community Engagement Specialist working with us on temporary assignment. Celine will be helping our office's efforts to reach community members about the Climate Plan Update and will be helping to manage the Community Climate Ambassadors Program.

We asked her a few get-to-know you questions so you can learn more about her and her background.

Q: Where are you from?

For any military brat this is a hard question. I was born in Sacramento but lived in Tucson for seven years and Okinawa for nine years. I’ve been living in Texas for 5 years now and love the people here, especially growing up around a lot of different cultures.

Q: What is your educational background?

A: I recently graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Environmental Science. My focus was in Geography and I hold a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Public Policy. I credit much of my knowledge and experience to community organizations like PODER. These organizations have given me many of the tools and resources for empowerment in the environmental field.

Q: Where did you work before joining our office?

A: Before joining the city, I interned with TCEQ's Nonpoint Source team. I helped develop ArcGIS layers to facilitate stakeholder-driven water quality planning and implementation. I also worked with the Office of Sustainability during the summer of 2018 as their Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Fellow. It’s great to be back!

Q: What will you be working on for the Office of Sustainability?

A: I am a Community Engagement Specialist assisting with promoting, supporting, and integrating community involvement into the 2020 Community Climate Plan update. This means applying an equity lens to all of our engagement efforts around climate planning and working to empower environmental justice efforts led by communities of color. As part of this effort, I will be managing the Community Climate Ambassadors Program.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do in Austin?

A: I love the Texas heat and enjoy swimming, biking, and laying out in the sun!

Q: What is the most recent (or your most favorite) sustainable thing you do in your personal life?

A: Just bought a new bike that I want to explore more of Austin with. I hope to get my friends to bike with me!

Q: What is your favorite book?

A: I really like The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri because the author explores themes of cultural identity that I have experienced in my own life.

Q: Are you a dog or a cat person?

A: I like dogs, particularly older dogs, because they tend to be more relaxed and sweet.

 

Oct 21, 2019 - 10:00 am CDT

Photo of two students in front of the Texas State Capitol Building. Text reads "Matthew Kim & Emma Galbraith Net-Zero Heroes"

We’re making Austin Net-Zero by: organizing students to demand climate action.

 

 

Meet Matthew Kim and Emma Galbraith, our newest Net-Zero Heroes. Matthew and Emma are Austin-area high school students who recently helped lead the youth climate change demonstrations on September 20 at the Texas State Capitol. As part of this effort, they both became co-founders of the Austin Climate Coalition. They were originally inspired by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg and her efforts to draw attention worldwide to the impact of climate change on future generations. Both Emma and Matthew are planning to be involved with the City of Austin’s Climate Plan Update, which will be happening through spring of next year. Matthew is a Junior at St. Stephens Episcopal School and Emma is a Senior at Austin High. 

We spoke with Emma and Matthew about how they were able to organize the student protests, what inspires them about doing activism work, and what motivates them to live Net-Zero. Read more below.

What inspired you to take action?

Emma: The global movement of teenage strikers taught me to have hope for the future of humanity, and to capitalize on that hope by organizing students in my region of the world.

Matthew: Seeing Greta Thunberg become the catalyst for the climate movement allowed me to understand the opportunity and the power that youth have to influence government. Before her, I didn’t believe that a highschooler could invoke action around the world, but I now see that young people who represent the future are important voices in this conversation. I have also read the news and have studied the IPCC report enough to understand that the world is at risk. Every single human being will experience the effects of climate change, whether they have to endure declining air quality or even abandon their homes because of extreme weather or lack of resources.

How did you do it?

Matthew: I began to take action by first connecting with other student activists like Emma to share ideas and goals that we believed were important to the youth and to our world. As a result, we helped start a group called the Austin Climate Coalition. I also became a co-founder of the Austin Chapter of Students for Climate Action. With both of these organizations, I was heavily involved with planning the Climate Strike on September 20 and speaking publicly about the need for stronger climate change policies.

Emma: For the Climate Strike, we worked with a broad network of students to organize the event. To do this, I helped reach out to other student groups, workers, faith groups, small businesses, community organizations, and content creators to ask them to strike with us. Planning the strike took lots of work and coordination, and it was incredible to see everyone gathered at the Capitol to make their voices heard.

  

Photos: Bill Holiday

Whats's been the toughest part?

Emma: The toughest part when organizing the strike has actually been keeping up with the overflowing enthusiasm from the people we have contacted. Our efforts to contact people in Austin have only shown us how ready Austinites are to make our city as green-forward as it can be, but being students, it can be difficult to keep track of it all! We’re solving this problem by continuing to grow our base of student organizers and constantly learning more about the organizing process that creates a grassroots movement.

Matthew: The toughest part for me has been juggling school, sports, climate activism, and so many other things that highschoolers are busy with. I’ve had to make a lot of sacrifices to maintain the amount of effort I put into my activism work, but I am completely confident that I have made the right choice to prioritize fighting for climate justice.

In addition, I believe in helping people become interested and active in our organizations, because I know that enough people in Austin support having a climate plan to ensure that Austin stays on a path towards sustainability. However, to get things done, more people need to invest their time into convincing elected officials that climate change is an important issue that needs to be addressed.

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

Matthew: The greatest reward has been to see the growing community of youth climate leaders in Austin who I have been working with for the past year. When I first got interested in the climate movement, I did not know many people outside of my school who were passionate about the environment, but now I have connections all over Austin. Those relationships have become very important to me for keeping connected and having power in numbers.

Also, having the news media take an interest in the work you are doing has been amazing to experience. For the climate strike, it encourages me to see reporters contact me and other organizers to request interviews about our work.

Emma: The greatest reward for me has absolutely been the privilege of empowering other people, especially younger people. It’s a gift to know that something we did has inspired someone else our age to join the fight, because that’s exactly how I got into climate organizing — by being inspired by teenagers I didn’t even know personally.

Photo: Julia Reihs / KUT

What advice do you have for others?

Matthew: Nobody is alone in the climate movement. You may be feeling isolated, but I assure you there are so many people in Austin who are also interested in seeing a sustainable future. There is a strong and growing community of people who care about our future and are urging the government to focus on the climate crisis. So, all you need to do is a little bit of research and join in! 

As youth, we have a lot of power to influence our government and other adults. If you believe you are too young to have any effect on your representatives, be excited because there are people like Greta Thunberg (16) and Alexandria Villasenor (14) who are making an impact both locally and internationally. They are showing the world that young people care about the future and have immense power to change minds and demand action. 

Emma: Dive in. You are never too young, and never too old. One of the things I love about community organizing is that you don’t need to have completed a certain level of schooling to become involved — you can simply join up with existing groups to begin working, and you can learn about organizing basics by reading books and accessing the wealth of information about social movements on the Internet. 

Also, there is always hope. To those who think the climate crisis is a pressing issue but that it’s too late to “fix” it, I look at it like this: done is better than perfect. The climate crisis is already here, so our task is not to completely prevent it, but instead to prevent the worst projected effects and to create a future that we can all live and thrive in. If you feel hopeless, I recommend finding a local environmental group and attending one of their meetings or group hangouts. Finding a community of people who are as concerned and passionate as I am showed me that I’m not alone, and it gives me hope every day.

To learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

Oct 03, 2019 - 01:03 pm CDT

Planning your fall garden

You may think that gardening for the year is over once you’ve harvested the last summer crop, but think again. During the fall, gardeners in Central Texas will (hopefully) begin to see cooler temperatures. After months of scorching hot weather, October and November start to offer up cool nights and bearable days. With a few minor preparations, a fall vegetable garden can be planted in late September or early October.

Follow these simple steps and you can enjoy fresh vegetables during the winter months:

Prepare the soil

Be sure to break up garden soil several inches deep – at least 3 to 6 inches – so seedlings can take root. Mix compost into the soil. If you don't compost, purchase bags of soilless potting mix and mix it in with the soil.

Two people gardening Mulch

Fall weather in Central Texas is still hot, and mulching helps trap moisture around plant roots. Always use a natural mulch like grass cuttings, straw, or leaves. Avoid using pebbles, shredded rubber, or anything else that doesn't "breathe".

Water regularly

If the ground dries out between watering, vegetable plants will grow irregularly and may become diseased.

Choose vegetables that are considered cool weather crops

Broccoli, greens, squash, peas, beans, and root vegetables, like beets, green onions, and turnips do well in fall gardens. Another not-so-obvious choice is the tomato plant. Tomatoes can suffer in the brutal Texas summer sun, but tend to flourish during the fall. For best results, plant your tomatoes in containers, so you can move them into the garage or house during cold weather.

Plant all seedlings before November

If you plant any later, seedlings may not have time to grow and bear fruit before possible cold snaps arrive in January. In the increasingly rare event of a freeze in Central Texas, be prepared to cover all plants with breathable coverings overnight, like old sheets, cotton table cloths, or pillow cases, and remove them once temperatures are above freezing.

Happy Fall, y’all!

Sep 11, 2019 - 03:33 pm CDT

 

I'm helping to make Austin Net-Zero by: helping people become beekeepers!

 

Meet our newest Net-Zero Hero, Dodie Stillman. Dodie is a certified Master Beekeeper who is passionate about honey bees and sharing her beekeeping knowledge. Dodie currently serves as the President of the Austin Area Beekeepers Association, where she teaches beginner and intermediate level beekeeping classes. We linked up with her at a recent meeting, where the beekeeping group was learning how to extract honey. The beekeepers were also encouraged to bring their own honey to the meeting so others could sample it.

We spoke with Dodie about how she got into beekeeping, what her toughest challenges have been, and what advice she has for other aspiring beekeepers. We’re also especially excited to share her story now since September is National Honey Month!

What inspired you to take action?

I have always been interested in honey bees, but it wasn’t until after I had my first bee colonies that I learned that both of my grandfathers were beekeepers. I guess it was in my blood!

I also wanted to do my part to help bees, since bee populations — both domesticated and wild — are falling. They are being threatened by habitat loss due to development, as well as disease and pests. Not only do honeybees pollinate some $587 million worth of crops every year in Texas, they also play a key role in pollinating wild plants. Without them, Texas might not have bluebonnets, foxgloves or columbines, all of which are pollinated by bees. 

How did you do it?

After my husband finally said I could add yet another thing to my long list of activities — mother of 2 wonderful young adults, working at Dell Technologies, active cyclist and jewelry artist — I looked for some local beekeeping classes to get started. Round Rock Honey had a class that included being able to put on a bee suit and watch up-close as someone opened an active bee colony, which was really exciting!

I also found the Austin Area Beekeeper Association and the Williamson County Area Beekeepers Association. I joined both clubs and started attending the monthly meetings even before I had bees. In one of the meetings, a presenter named Lance Wilson included his contact information on the last slide.  I think I sent Lance a question a day for a month, and he became — and is still — a great mentor to me.

Later, I was in the inaugural class of the Texas Master Beekeeper Program put on by the Texas Apiary Inspection Service and Texas A&M University. I was one of the first seven Master Beekeepers in Texas! Going through the program taught me so much about honey bees and beekeeping. I continue to learn from books, websites, and attending seminars and conventions where I get to listen and learn from some of the greatest beekeepers in the country.

 

 

 

Whats's been the toughest part?

Getting stung multiple times at once! Only the female honey bee can sting, but she can only sting one time, and then she dies. It hurts double for me — the pain of the sting, and knowing that a honey bee felt threatened enough to give up her life by stinging me.

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

My husband is now my assistant beekeeper, and he’s the best!

Since learning beekeeping, I have come full circle and now teach classes at Round Rock Honey and Texas Honey Bee Farm. I also manage colonies for agricultural valuations for land owners. I’ve been able to make beekeeping my new career and I love helping people get started. Honey bees are so vital to our existence because of their specialized ability to pollinate our fruits and vegetables. While we need commercial beekeepers to continue to pollinate our crops, it’s going to be all the individuals that have only a couple of hives that will keep our honey bee population alive and growing strong!

 

 

What advice do you have for others?

First off, if your local laws and HOA allows, keep bees! You can start small like I did by taking some classes and joining a local beekeeping club. Once you’re ready, order your honey bees in November and December so they will arrive in April in time for the wildflowers that bloom all over Central Texas.

If you can’t keep bees, there are so many things you can do to help all pollinators! Dandelions are very beneficial, so try not to mow them. You can also plant a pollinator garden, or create a nice water supply (just remember that bees can’t swim, so place rocks or something that floats in the water). If you must use pesticides, please follow the label and only use them in the late evening when the honey bees are secure in their hives. Buy honey from local beekeepers to show your support. Shop at Farmers Markets and purchase organic fruits and vegetables to support organic farmers and avoid genetically modified crops. Finally, donations are always welcome at the Texas Beekeepers Association or the Texas Honey Bee Education Association. Lastly, there is about to be an awesome honey bee specialty license plate design in the near future — my car will have one!

 

 

>> The Austin Area Beekeepers Association meetings are free and open to the public. You can join them on the third Monday of each month at the Frickett Scout Center on I-35 and Parmer. On January 4, 2020, the group will hold its annual seminar at the Marriott North in Round Rock. The seminar is a great place to learn about honey bees and how to keep them!

 

Logo: Net-ZeroTo learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

 

Jan 29, 2020 - 11:34 am CST

Leading with Equity in Austin's Climate Plan Update

As we embark on revising Austin’s Community Climate Plan, a lot has changed since we created our first plan in 2015. We now know that climate change is happening faster than we thought, and that the landscape of potential solutions has changed in terms of cost and technology. We also know that climate solutions have the potential to improve everyone’s quality of life, but climate change impacts don’t affect everyone equally. This is why we are leading with racial equity and learning from the lived experience of people in our community as we explore solutions to the climate crisis.

As part of our planning process, we convened six advisory groups that will focus on specific topics related to energy, transportation, food, and access to nature. We also launched a Climate Ambassadors Program that will give us the opportunity to hear from people in our community who have been historically left out of the conversation.

All-in-all, this effort includes over 130 people who will meet over the course of six months. In order to give everyone a foundation and common understanding of racial equity and environmental justice issues, we asked that everyone participate in an equity-focused workshop.

Two people talking to eachother in a conference room.  A group of people sitting in a circle in a conference room. They are facing a facilitator and powerpoint screen.

Several people sitting in small groups and talking in a conference room. 

Laying the foundation for racial equity

 

In creating the workshop, our goal was to have authentic and meaningful conversations around race, class, and equity in the context of Austin’s history. We chose Dr. Tane Ward to lead the discussion, because he has over 15 years of experience in facilitation with a focus on social issues and expertise in racial and climate justice. 

Through the course of the workshop, Dr. Ward helped create the space to discuss the history and legacy of colonialism. The conversations were meant to challenge and address long-held perspectives, and create an understanding of how economic and racial segregation impact health, education, and wealth outcomes. As part of the workshop, Dr. Ward offered the following Justice Litmus test:

  1. Is there a sense of urgency in our work?
  2. Are we using either/or thinking or decision-making?
  3. Is our work displaying signs of paternalism?
  4. Is there fear of open conflict in our work?
  5. Is the right to comfort being prioritized in our work?
  6. Are we applying tunnel vision to our work?
  7. Are we avoiding “reinventing the wheel” in our work?
  8. Does growth or money reflect our values?
  9. Are leaders being nurtured and developed horizontally?
  10. Is open critique of our work met with “aggressive appreciation” to minimize the critique or avoid discomfort?

These principles are meant to act as a screening process to help us shift our thinking and behavior in ways that are meant to defeat white supremacist culture. We will be using the Justice Litmus test as a tool to help keep us accountable as we build a plan that is actionable and will result in real change as we strive for climate justice in our community and beyond.

Reflections and takeaways

 

After the workshop, we asked a couple of participants to reflect on what they took away from the exercise, and how it will impact their work in the future. Here’s what they had to say:

"The workshop prompted us to engage in meaningful discussions about how urban plans reproduce racial injustice. We walked through a series of exercises to envision how the Climate Action Plan can advance equitable solutions. This created a critical foundation for how the group will plan a more green and just Austin." – Miriam Solis, Assistant Professor at the UT School of Architecture

“My experience at the workshop was extremely insightful and full of inspirational nuggets. I plan to apply what I learned in a couple ways. The first is through my day to day job as a Landscape Architect Designer. I plan to emphasize the need for a more equitable lens through more community engagement, using sustainable materiality, and taking into account the socioeconomic impact of the projects I am a part of. The second way is to educate myself more on the history of Austin and other equity issues so I can apply it to my work. Overall, the workshop has broadened my perspective of the relationships between people and place, and ultimately in realizing how the racial divide is still very apparent.” – Francisco J Rosales, Landscape Architect Designer, TBG Partners

 

If you’d like to get involved in the Climate Plan Process, please consider attending one of our five community workshops around Transportation, access to nature, consumerism, and sustainable buildings. You can see the full schedule here under “Get Involved”.

Sustainable Austin Blog
Jan 23, 2020 - 02:01 pm CST

By: Taja Beekley, Sales & Event Manager at the Austin Central Library and proud dog owner of Willoughby.

When we adopt a pet, we commit ourselves to a life of love and care. There are ways that we can incorporate a more earth-friendly approach to their wellbeing. Although it may seem more expensive or time consuming, these endeavors can often lead to a happier and healthier pet, as well as cost savings for their owner.

Reduce Your Carbon Footprint:

  • Pedal your pet to the vet. Select a veterinarian that is close to your home. Have a bike trailer for your kids? Try using it for your four-legged friend. If the clinic is within walking distance and no trailer is required, even better. Willoughby is better behaved at the vet after taking in fresh air on his way to the appointment.
  • Literally “run errands” with your pet. If you are fortunate to reside in an area that is both dog and pedestrian friendly, walk or run your dog to the pet store or other retailer, coffee shop, bank, chiropractor, etc. Often, these places provide free dog treats and water bowls.

Engage in Sustainable Living:

  • Environmental poop bags. Purchase biodegradable/compostable poop bags. Just be aware of false marketing claims and make sure you purchase from reputable brand.
  • Homemade Meals and Treats. Reusable containers are very handy if you have time to prepare food. Willoughby eats a combination of chicken, beef, and salmon. Include older/bruised fruits and vegetables to your dog’s diet you can always freeze them for later. For those dogs with sensitive stomachs like Willoughby, switching to a homemade diet has saved time and money at the vet.
  • Bones. Buy bones from ranchers at the neighborhood Farmers Market and take your dog to pick them up.
  • Upcycled toys. If you are crafty, old tennis balls and clothes (especially jeans) can be re-purposed for toys. Willoughby especially likes to play with paper boxes.
  • Teeth brushing. Use a bamboo toothbrush and organic coconut oil for oral hygiene. Tooth brushing is now part of Willoughby’s daily routine he loves the flavor and attention.
  • Compost pet hair and nail clippings. If you are not currently in Austin Resource Recovery’s Curbside Composting Collection Program, try establishing your own compost system at home you may even be eligible for a rebate.

Go on Green Adventures:

  • Keep Austin Beautiful. Many local nonprofit organizations offer volunteer-based events. Sign up and take your dog. Willoughby loves meeting new friends.
  • Scoop the Poop. Always pick up after your own dog’s waste and other less responsible dog owners especially around our parks, trails, and waterways.

Sustainable Austin Blog
Jan 23, 2020 - 10:48 am CST

Photo of Raasin McIntosh posing near a couple of brightly-painted pillars. Graphic next to her reads "Raasin McIntosh Net-Zero Hero"

I’m helping to make Austin Net-Zero by: beautifying communities

Headshot of Raasin McIntosh wearing a black hat that says "Texas 1989"

Meet Raasin McIntosh, Olympic and collegiate athlete and Founder of the non-profit organization Raasin in the Sun. Raasin was first inspired to create community beautification projects when she travelled to West Africa in 2012 to compete in front of thousands of fans. There, she became inspired by the local children who were “full of light and energy”. It was then that she decided that she wanted to spend her time inspiring others to shine their light.

Rooted in East Austin, Raasin in the Sun works to beautify urban communities through projects that unite residents. We met up with Raasin at a recently completed mural project on Rosewood Avenue underneath Pleasant Valley Road. Read on to discover what drives her, what her toughest challenges have been, and what advice she has for others.

What inspired you to take action?

Understanding that we have the ability to take action, improve the environment, and inspire others to do the same. To shine light so that others can be truly inspired to shine their own light and rise above adversity.

Community clean-up.  Raasin in work gloves helping with a community clean-up.

How did you do it?

I created Raasin in the Sun to have a platform for creating various types of beautification projects ranging from building community gardens, organizing community clean ups, painting murals, and restoring residential and vacant lots. I’m so inspired when I’m working collaboratively to transform unused places to areas of community pride where people can gather, grow healthy food, and enjoy greener and unique spaces. Bringing together volunteers to do the shared work of beautification means creating strong bonds through tackling problems together creatively.

One of the really memorable projects for me was when we helped restore the home of prominent East Austinites Wilhelmina and Exalton Delco. Wilhelmina is the first African American elected to public office in Austin, and served 10 terms in the Texas Legislature. Another project we completed with our community partners last year involved transforming pillars along Rosewood Avenue underneath Pleasant Valley Road into works of art. For this project, we got to work with six local artists to beautify the pillars. We’ve also worked on garden projects for Ortega Elementary and Cultivo Café in East Austin.

Elderly couple sitting outside their home.  Group photo underneath an overpass.

What's been the toughest part?

The toughest part has been developing and growing our vacant lot initiatives. Vacant lot projects can be a long and challenging process. There are often time constraints since most of the lots are in urban areas with plans for future development. In addition, a crucial component is corporation funding and cooperation from the City to truly help these types of projects come to life so that the community can benefit while the lots are still vacant.

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

Mural beautification has proven to be one of the most impactful types of projects we do, since it allows us to create opportunities for artists to do what they do best. The greatest reward is seeing the efforts and mission of the organization truly play out in the most beautifully creative ways.

Brightly colored collage of Raasin and other artists painting murals on pillars underneath an overpass.

What advice do you have for others?

Let your passion drive your creativity in making the world a better place.

Photo of Raasin smiling next to a quote that reads "Let your passion drive your creativity in making the world a better place."

To learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

Sustainable Austin Blog
Nov 19, 2019 - 12:57 pm CST

Giving thanks sustainably

As Thanksgiving approaches, menu planning, trips to reconnect with family and friends, and Black Friday shopping lists can be front-of-mind. We propose shifting your perspective to slow down and simplify this year. Since this is a holiday based on gratitude, why not start from a place of feeling abundant and plentiful? When we recognize everything we already have, it’s easier to think about ways to reduce our impact on the planet.

Here are five tips to have a more sustainable Thanksgiving that begins with a mindset focused on the plenty all around us:

 

Explore your local farmer’s market

There are so many beautiful fruits and vegetables grown locally! Buying local food means fewer food miles, which in turn means lower greenhouse gas emissions. Conventionally grown food travels roughly 1,500 miles from farm to plate, compared to just 50 miles for local products. And smaller local farms typically use more sustainable farming methods like using compost as a natural fertilizer.

Ditch the disposables

With so many different dishes being served and with so many people at the table, Thanksgiving dinner can turn into a big pile of dishes. So, it’s not uncommon for regular plates, cups, napkins, and silverware to be swapped with disposables. But this is a special occasion that deserves the fine china or grandma’s heirlooms! Sure, it’ll mean a little extra time at the sink, but it’s also a time to reflect on the memories of other special dinners and events where you’ve used the extra-special plates and silver.

Grow what you throw

Every Thanksgiving, Americans throw away over 200 million pounds uneaten turkey. That’s a lot of food being wasted. Compost your table scraps this year and turn what would be wasted into fertilizer for future food instead.

Create a holiday gift list that’s not about stuff

Instead of waiting in long lines on Black Friday or placing orders on Cyber Monday that involves lots of packaging and delivery miles traveled, consider creating a holiday gift list focused on services, experiences, or time. Treating those you love to a spa service, a dinner out, tickets to a concert, or a gift certificate to babysit may be more meaningful than stuff. Your friends and family will be touched, and the earth will be thankful as well!

Avoid the food coma and get outside

Many families like to celebrate Thanksgiving Day by watching a movie or a sports game on TV together. Try mixing it up this year and get outside for a while. Take a walk with your loved ones to a nearby park, enjoy some pre-dinner snacks on the front porch, or play frisbee or football in the crisp autumn air. Getting outside and embracing nature is a great way to give thanks to the earth!

 

Deep breaths everybody – Thanksgiving can be a time to slow down and truly give thanks. And embracing just a few of the above changes amounts to a much bigger impact for the planet!

Sustainable Austin Blog
Nov 15, 2019 - 03:50 pm CST

Photo of woman with short brown hair in front of a doorway to a home. Text reads "Taylor Youngblood Net-Zero Hero"

I’m helping to make Austin Net-Zero by: encouraging neighbors to actively take part in zero waste.

 

Meet Taylor Youngblood, a recycle and reuse advocate and Zero Waste Block Leader. Taylor regularly provides advice to her neighbors in the Mueller neighborhood about recycling, composting, and reuse. She tables at events, runs a blog, and has started several collection programs for hard-to-recycle items in her neighborhood. Taylor’s passion is to make zero waste concepts accessible to everyone and she makes it her mission to answer even the most detailed questions from community members.

We spoke with Taylor about what motivates her, what her toughest challenges have been, and what inspires her share her zero waste knowledge. Read more below.

 

What inspired you to take action?

It all started when I was walking my dogs and observing recycling and trash carts in my neighborhood one day. When I looked closely, I noticed that there was so much contamination in the recycling carts. Just as sad were all the discarded items that could have had a second life if they had been reused or donated.

When the opportunity to attend Zero Waste Block Leader training came up, I jumped at the opportunity to learn all I could about recycling in Austin.  It seemed like the more I learned, the more questions I started getting from neighbors and friends. That’s when I decided to really amp things up.

Net-Zero can feel like this big, abstract concept. The long road from here to there can seem intimidating, overwhelming, and even impossible to tackle all at once. My goal is to make that road feel accessible and navigable. Being a Zero Waste Block Leader lets me share my passion.

A bright red poster with detailed recycling instructions for the Mueller Recycling Group.  Taylor and her husband composting

Taylor tabling at an outreach event.

 

How did you do it?

I work to stay up-to-date on what Net-Zero actually means across the different domains: compost, recycling, re-use, etc. I try to break down those details and rules into practical daily habits and share them on my blog alittlemore.green, social media, at neighborhood events, and really wherever anyone wants to talk to me about zero waste. What I’m shooting for is habits that are easy to understand, adopt, and even enjoy.

I began by posting photos, comments, and Austin Resource Recovery links on our neighborhood Facebook Group and NextDoor. A neighbor recommended I use my Zero Waste Block Leader title, so I started including it on posts and wearing my Block Leader shirt at Mueller events. I love walkup questions!

After curbside composting came to our neighborhood, I was asked to write an article introducing and explaining the program for the neighborhood newsletter. Then the questions really started coming in! I began tabling at all the neighborhood events and attending and presenting at the neighborhood association meetings. I started a blog to share longer posts and more in-depth information.

I also started collecting Styrofoam and random large items for the Austin Recycle & Reuse Drop-off Center at my home. Soon, I was receiving requests for more collection times and a wider variety of materials. Neighbors started asking how they could help with these collections so I started the Mueller Recycling Group where you can sign up to collect items from neighbors that need to be taken to the Drop-off Center or mailed in to a program like TerraCycle. That evolved further once I learned about other opportunities to recycle like Wands for Wildlife and contact lens recycling. That led me to start working with Mueller’s local businesses to recycle their products as well. I hope to find more opportunities in the future.

Taylor holding up a recyclable plastic package.  Taylor and her son composting

Whats's been the toughest part?

Figuring out how to educate and engage people. Despite reaching out in person and on more than four digital platforms, it’s still difficult to connect with everyone. I can’t seem to find the missing link. It’s also frustrating and sad when people genuinely don't know they're contaminating their recycling or compost. And, trying to educate people on what they don’t know they don’t know is a real uphill battle.

 

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

Meeting more neighbors than I ever would have otherwise. Being a Zero Waste Block Leader has led to several leadership positions in the neighborhood and helped me make so many friends. That has been amazing! Engagement really brings neighbors together and builds community a place where neighbors stop and greet each other by name.

The greatest reward is the increased interest. I’m starting to see more in-depth and difficult questions. I’m seeing people participate across multiple discussions and helping to advise each other directly. And, of course, I’m always thrilled when neighbors tell me they share my posts with friends and family! That’s so inspiring.

Taylor about to compost a coffee filter.  Taylor recycling laundry bottle and yogurt container in her home.

What advice do you have for others?

Look, listen and be available. Look with beginner’s eyes for areas where you can help. Where can you speak up on a topic or issue that you have passion or knowledge about?

Listen to your community. I think I’ve been successful at affecting change because I listen to neighbors’ concerns and questions, I follow up with them, and I get them an answer. I make myself available and I show I’m a real person experiencing the same things they are.

Communication is key. Providing more information is always better than less. I want to know everything I can about everything recycling and compost, and others out there do too.

Reach people who are new to Austin. People are moving here every day, and we need to educate them about how to reuse and properly recycle items in Austin. We need to get everyone on board if we’re going to achieve Net-Zero.

Taylor with her son outside of her home next to a sign that reads "Zero Waste Block Leader austinrecycles.com"

 

To learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

 

Sustainable Austin Blog
Nov 14, 2019 - 02:31 pm CST

We’re pleased to introduce you to Celine Rendon, a Community Engagement Specialist working with us on temporary assignment. Celine will be helping our office's efforts to reach community members about the Climate Plan Update and will be helping to manage the Community Climate Ambassadors Program.

We asked her a few get-to-know you questions so you can learn more about her and her background.

Q: Where are you from?

For any military brat this is a hard question. I was born in Sacramento but lived in Tucson for seven years and Okinawa for nine years. I’ve been living in Texas for 5 years now and love the people here, especially growing up around a lot of different cultures.

Q: What is your educational background?

A: I recently graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Environmental Science. My focus was in Geography and I hold a Bridging Disciplines Program certificate in Public Policy. I credit much of my knowledge and experience to community organizations like PODER. These organizations have given me many of the tools and resources for empowerment in the environmental field.

Q: Where did you work before joining our office?

A: Before joining the city, I interned with TCEQ's Nonpoint Source team. I helped develop ArcGIS layers to facilitate stakeholder-driven water quality planning and implementation. I also worked with the Office of Sustainability during the summer of 2018 as their Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Fellow. It’s great to be back!

Q: What will you be working on for the Office of Sustainability?

A: I am a Community Engagement Specialist assisting with promoting, supporting, and integrating community involvement into the 2020 Community Climate Plan update. This means applying an equity lens to all of our engagement efforts around climate planning and working to empower environmental justice efforts led by communities of color. As part of this effort, I will be managing the Community Climate Ambassadors Program.

Q: What is your favorite thing to do in Austin?

A: I love the Texas heat and enjoy swimming, biking, and laying out in the sun!

Q: What is the most recent (or your most favorite) sustainable thing you do in your personal life?

A: Just bought a new bike that I want to explore more of Austin with. I hope to get my friends to bike with me!

Q: What is your favorite book?

A: I really like The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri because the author explores themes of cultural identity that I have experienced in my own life.

Q: Are you a dog or a cat person?

A: I like dogs, particularly older dogs, because they tend to be more relaxed and sweet.

 

Sustainable Austin Blog
Oct 21, 2019 - 10:00 am CDT

Photo of two students in front of the Texas State Capitol Building. Text reads "Matthew Kim & Emma Galbraith Net-Zero Heroes"

We’re making Austin Net-Zero by: organizing students to demand climate action.

 

 

Meet Matthew Kim and Emma Galbraith, our newest Net-Zero Heroes. Matthew and Emma are Austin-area high school students who recently helped lead the youth climate change demonstrations on September 20 at the Texas State Capitol. As part of this effort, they both became co-founders of the Austin Climate Coalition. They were originally inspired by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg and her efforts to draw attention worldwide to the impact of climate change on future generations. Both Emma and Matthew are planning to be involved with the City of Austin’s Climate Plan Update, which will be happening through spring of next year. Matthew is a Junior at St. Stephens Episcopal School and Emma is a Senior at Austin High. 

We spoke with Emma and Matthew about how they were able to organize the student protests, what inspires them about doing activism work, and what motivates them to live Net-Zero. Read more below.

What inspired you to take action?

Emma: The global movement of teenage strikers taught me to have hope for the future of humanity, and to capitalize on that hope by organizing students in my region of the world.

Matthew: Seeing Greta Thunberg become the catalyst for the climate movement allowed me to understand the opportunity and the power that youth have to influence government. Before her, I didn’t believe that a highschooler could invoke action around the world, but I now see that young people who represent the future are important voices in this conversation. I have also read the news and have studied the IPCC report enough to understand that the world is at risk. Every single human being will experience the effects of climate change, whether they have to endure declining air quality or even abandon their homes because of extreme weather or lack of resources.

How did you do it?

Matthew: I began to take action by first connecting with other student activists like Emma to share ideas and goals that we believed were important to the youth and to our world. As a result, we helped start a group called the Austin Climate Coalition. I also became a co-founder of the Austin Chapter of Students for Climate Action. With both of these organizations, I was heavily involved with planning the Climate Strike on September 20 and speaking publicly about the need for stronger climate change policies.

Emma: For the Climate Strike, we worked with a broad network of students to organize the event. To do this, I helped reach out to other student groups, workers, faith groups, small businesses, community organizations, and content creators to ask them to strike with us. Planning the strike took lots of work and coordination, and it was incredible to see everyone gathered at the Capitol to make their voices heard.

  

Photos: Bill Holiday

Whats's been the toughest part?

Emma: The toughest part when organizing the strike has actually been keeping up with the overflowing enthusiasm from the people we have contacted. Our efforts to contact people in Austin have only shown us how ready Austinites are to make our city as green-forward as it can be, but being students, it can be difficult to keep track of it all! We’re solving this problem by continuing to grow our base of student organizers and constantly learning more about the organizing process that creates a grassroots movement.

Matthew: The toughest part for me has been juggling school, sports, climate activism, and so many other things that highschoolers are busy with. I’ve had to make a lot of sacrifices to maintain the amount of effort I put into my activism work, but I am completely confident that I have made the right choice to prioritize fighting for climate justice.

In addition, I believe in helping people become interested and active in our organizations, because I know that enough people in Austin support having a climate plan to ensure that Austin stays on a path towards sustainability. However, to get things done, more people need to invest their time into convincing elected officials that climate change is an important issue that needs to be addressed.

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

Matthew: The greatest reward has been to see the growing community of youth climate leaders in Austin who I have been working with for the past year. When I first got interested in the climate movement, I did not know many people outside of my school who were passionate about the environment, but now I have connections all over Austin. Those relationships have become very important to me for keeping connected and having power in numbers.

Also, having the news media take an interest in the work you are doing has been amazing to experience. For the climate strike, it encourages me to see reporters contact me and other organizers to request interviews about our work.

Emma: The greatest reward for me has absolutely been the privilege of empowering other people, especially younger people. It’s a gift to know that something we did has inspired someone else our age to join the fight, because that’s exactly how I got into climate organizing — by being inspired by teenagers I didn’t even know personally.

Photo: Julia Reihs / KUT

What advice do you have for others?

Matthew: Nobody is alone in the climate movement. You may be feeling isolated, but I assure you there are so many people in Austin who are also interested in seeing a sustainable future. There is a strong and growing community of people who care about our future and are urging the government to focus on the climate crisis. So, all you need to do is a little bit of research and join in! 

As youth, we have a lot of power to influence our government and other adults. If you believe you are too young to have any effect on your representatives, be excited because there are people like Greta Thunberg (16) and Alexandria Villasenor (14) who are making an impact both locally and internationally. They are showing the world that young people care about the future and have immense power to change minds and demand action. 

Emma: Dive in. You are never too young, and never too old. One of the things I love about community organizing is that you don’t need to have completed a certain level of schooling to become involved — you can simply join up with existing groups to begin working, and you can learn about organizing basics by reading books and accessing the wealth of information about social movements on the Internet. 

Also, there is always hope. To those who think the climate crisis is a pressing issue but that it’s too late to “fix” it, I look at it like this: done is better than perfect. The climate crisis is already here, so our task is not to completely prevent it, but instead to prevent the worst projected effects and to create a future that we can all live and thrive in. If you feel hopeless, I recommend finding a local environmental group and attending one of their meetings or group hangouts. Finding a community of people who are as concerned and passionate as I am showed me that I’m not alone, and it gives me hope every day.

To learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

Sustainable Austin Blog
Oct 03, 2019 - 01:03 pm CDT

Planning your fall garden

You may think that gardening for the year is over once you’ve harvested the last summer crop, but think again. During the fall, gardeners in Central Texas will (hopefully) begin to see cooler temperatures. After months of scorching hot weather, October and November start to offer up cool nights and bearable days. With a few minor preparations, a fall vegetable garden can be planted in late September or early October.

Follow these simple steps and you can enjoy fresh vegetables during the winter months:

Prepare the soil

Be sure to break up garden soil several inches deep – at least 3 to 6 inches – so seedlings can take root. Mix compost into the soil. If you don't compost, purchase bags of soilless potting mix and mix it in with the soil.

Two people gardening Mulch

Fall weather in Central Texas is still hot, and mulching helps trap moisture around plant roots. Always use a natural mulch like grass cuttings, straw, or leaves. Avoid using pebbles, shredded rubber, or anything else that doesn't "breathe".

Water regularly

If the ground dries out between watering, vegetable plants will grow irregularly and may become diseased.

Choose vegetables that are considered cool weather crops

Broccoli, greens, squash, peas, beans, and root vegetables, like beets, green onions, and turnips do well in fall gardens. Another not-so-obvious choice is the tomato plant. Tomatoes can suffer in the brutal Texas summer sun, but tend to flourish during the fall. For best results, plant your tomatoes in containers, so you can move them into the garage or house during cold weather.

Plant all seedlings before November

If you plant any later, seedlings may not have time to grow and bear fruit before possible cold snaps arrive in January. In the increasingly rare event of a freeze in Central Texas, be prepared to cover all plants with breathable coverings overnight, like old sheets, cotton table cloths, or pillow cases, and remove them once temperatures are above freezing.

Happy Fall, y’all!

Sustainable Austin Blog
Sep 11, 2019 - 03:33 pm CDT

 

I'm helping to make Austin Net-Zero by: helping people become beekeepers!

 

Meet our newest Net-Zero Hero, Dodie Stillman. Dodie is a certified Master Beekeeper who is passionate about honey bees and sharing her beekeeping knowledge. Dodie currently serves as the President of the Austin Area Beekeepers Association, where she teaches beginner and intermediate level beekeeping classes. We linked up with her at a recent meeting, where the beekeeping group was learning how to extract honey. The beekeepers were also encouraged to bring their own honey to the meeting so others could sample it.

We spoke with Dodie about how she got into beekeeping, what her toughest challenges have been, and what advice she has for other aspiring beekeepers. We’re also especially excited to share her story now since September is National Honey Month!

What inspired you to take action?

I have always been interested in honey bees, but it wasn’t until after I had my first bee colonies that I learned that both of my grandfathers were beekeepers. I guess it was in my blood!

I also wanted to do my part to help bees, since bee populations — both domesticated and wild — are falling. They are being threatened by habitat loss due to development, as well as disease and pests. Not only do honeybees pollinate some $587 million worth of crops every year in Texas, they also play a key role in pollinating wild plants. Without them, Texas might not have bluebonnets, foxgloves or columbines, all of which are pollinated by bees. 

How did you do it?

After my husband finally said I could add yet another thing to my long list of activities — mother of 2 wonderful young adults, working at Dell Technologies, active cyclist and jewelry artist — I looked for some local beekeeping classes to get started. Round Rock Honey had a class that included being able to put on a bee suit and watch up-close as someone opened an active bee colony, which was really exciting!

I also found the Austin Area Beekeeper Association and the Williamson County Area Beekeepers Association. I joined both clubs and started attending the monthly meetings even before I had bees. In one of the meetings, a presenter named Lance Wilson included his contact information on the last slide.  I think I sent Lance a question a day for a month, and he became — and is still — a great mentor to me.

Later, I was in the inaugural class of the Texas Master Beekeeper Program put on by the Texas Apiary Inspection Service and Texas A&M University. I was one of the first seven Master Beekeepers in Texas! Going through the program taught me so much about honey bees and beekeeping. I continue to learn from books, websites, and attending seminars and conventions where I get to listen and learn from some of the greatest beekeepers in the country.

 

 

 

Whats's been the toughest part?

Getting stung multiple times at once! Only the female honey bee can sting, but she can only sting one time, and then she dies. It hurts double for me — the pain of the sting, and knowing that a honey bee felt threatened enough to give up her life by stinging me.

Have there been any unexpected benefits?

My husband is now my assistant beekeeper, and he’s the best!

Since learning beekeeping, I have come full circle and now teach classes at Round Rock Honey and Texas Honey Bee Farm. I also manage colonies for agricultural valuations for land owners. I’ve been able to make beekeeping my new career and I love helping people get started. Honey bees are so vital to our existence because of their specialized ability to pollinate our fruits and vegetables. While we need commercial beekeepers to continue to pollinate our crops, it’s going to be all the individuals that have only a couple of hives that will keep our honey bee population alive and growing strong!

 

 

What advice do you have for others?

First off, if your local laws and HOA allows, keep bees! You can start small like I did by taking some classes and joining a local beekeeping club. Once you’re ready, order your honey bees in November and December so they will arrive in April in time for the wildflowers that bloom all over Central Texas.

If you can’t keep bees, there are so many things you can do to help all pollinators! Dandelions are very beneficial, so try not to mow them. You can also plant a pollinator garden, or create a nice water supply (just remember that bees can’t swim, so place rocks or something that floats in the water). If you must use pesticides, please follow the label and only use them in the late evening when the honey bees are secure in their hives. Buy honey from local beekeepers to show your support. Shop at Farmers Markets and purchase organic fruits and vegetables to support organic farmers and avoid genetically modified crops. Finally, donations are always welcome at the Texas Beekeepers Association or the Texas Honey Bee Education Association. Lastly, there is about to be an awesome honey bee specialty license plate design in the near future — my car will have one!

 

 

>> The Austin Area Beekeepers Association meetings are free and open to the public. You can join them on the third Monday of each month at the Frickett Scout Center on I-35 and Parmer. On January 4, 2020, the group will hold its annual seminar at the Marriott North in Round Rock. The seminar is a great place to learn about honey bees and how to keep them!

 

Logo: Net-ZeroTo learn more about Austin's Net-Zero Goal, view the Community Climate Plan.

Share your Net-Zero contributions with us on Twitter or Facebook and use #NetZeroHero. If you know a Net-Zero Hero (or heroes!) who should be recognized for their efforts, send your nomination to sustainability@austintexas.gov.

 

Sustainable Austin Blog